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Dwarf millet discovery

first_imgAthens, Ga. – While pearl millet is a major food staple in some of the fastest growing regions on Earth, relatively little is know about the drought-hardy grain. Recently, plant geneticists at the University of Georgia successfully isolated the gene that creates dwarfed varieties of pearl millet. It is the first time a gene controlling an important agronomic trait has been isolated in the pearl millet genome. Their work appeared in the March edition of the journal G3: Genes, Genomics, Genetics. The dwarf varieties are economically important in the U.S. and India in particular. Dwarf varieties are used as forage plants in the U.S. and are grown as a food staple in India. The researchers, led by UGA’s Katrien Devos, also were able to trace the dwarf gene to plants bred 50 years ago by Glenn Burton, a UGA plant breeder who worked on the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Tifton campus. Knowing which gene controls the dwarfing trait will help plant breeders create more efficient, sustainable varieties of millet that have the short stature some farmers and ranchers are looking for. “Knowing the actual gene that reduces plant height has allowed us to develop markers that can be used by breeders to screen for the presence of the gene long before the effects of the gene can be visually observed,” said Devos, a professor in the CAES’s Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, housed in the department of crop and soil sciences, and the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences’ department of plant biology. “In the longer term, the knowledge gained in pearl millet will help to develop semi-dwarf lines with high agronomic performance in other cereal crops,” she said. Rajiv K. Parvathaneni, a doctoral student working in Devos’ lab, was in charge of tracking down the gene, which works by controlling the flow of the growth hormone auxin through the plant. He also wanted to understand the mechanism by which the gene controls auxin and to develop plant-breeder-friendly markers that would allow breeders to screen for the dwarfing gene before their plants matured. The gene that Parvathaneni found affects the downward transport of auxin, which is made in the top part of the plant. If this gene is on, the auxin flows freely, and millet grows to its full height, about 10 feet. If it is off, the millet plant may only grow to be 3 to 5 feet in height. Parvathaneni and Devos’ team first found which region of the pearl millet’s genome contributed to growth and then compared that section to a similar section of DNA from sorghum. Sorghum is a grain related to pearl millet, and a complete map of its genome recently was released by Devos’ UGA colleague Andy Paterson. The comparison revealed that ABCB1, a gene controlling auxin transport and causing reduced plant height in sorghum, was the prime gene candidate controlling pearl millet dwarf stature, Devos said. Comparative genome analysis, a process in which an unmapped genome is compared to the genome of a similar and more thoroughly described plant genome, is a common method used to help identify the functions of specific genes. This method is especially useful in crops for which little genetic resources are available. Next Devos’ team will work with researchers in other states to understand more fully how auxin transport differs in tall and dwarf millet plants and to verify that ABCB1 is in fact the gene that controls dwarfism. After Devos and Parvathaneni located the dwarfing gene, they tested pearl millet dwarfs from around the world. All dwarfs caused by a non-functional ABCB1 gene have the same mutation as the dwarfs that were first bred by Burton in the 1960s. Dwarf varieties of pearl millet are not ideal for every planting situation. In Africa, many farmers prefer taller varieties because they use the long stalks for roofing thatch and many other applications. However, where millet is intensively cultivated, dwarf millet allows farmers to harvest the grain with mechanical threshers. Ranchers like dwarf millet as forage plant because it has a high leaf to stem ratio, Devos said. Knowing more about the plant in general is key to broadening production of the very drought resistant, hardy grain. “The crop itself has a future, a bright one—especially in regions where climate change may lead to more erratic rain fall patterns as pearl millet is highly drought tolerant. It already is a popular food crop in semi-arid regions of India and Africa and will likely gain interest from drought-prone regions of the developed world as an alternative to corn in animal feed,” Parvathaneni said. The full text of the journal article, “Candidate Gene Underlying the d2 Dwarfing Phenotype in Pearl Millet, Cenchrus americanus (L.) Morrone,” is available at www.g3journal.org/content/current.last_img read more

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Asian nations vow cooperation on avian flu

first_imgDec 2, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – As public health ministers and officials from 13 Asian countries conferred in Bangkok last week on how to prevent the spread of H5N1 avian influenza, experts offered troubling predictions.The highly lethal H5N1 strain, which has claimed tens of millions of poultry across eastern Asia this year, is the world’s likeliest candidate to cause global devastation in the form of a human flu pandemic, according to experts from the World Health Organization (WHO).While acknowledging that all estimates are essentially guesses, WHO experts have predicted in recent weeks that a pandemic could kill anywhere from 2 million to 100 million people.Confirmed H5N1 avian flu has already killed 32 people and sickened 12 more in Vietnam and Thailand this year. What is keeping the disease in check, for now, is the virus’s inability to spread easily from person to person.Under the shadow of that threat, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and other Asian countries sought to reach agreements on how to collaborate to prevent the spread of the disease at a conference that ended Nov 26.In a joint closing statement, delegates pledged to collaborate through prompt and open communication, research, and allocation of resources, according to a press release from the WHO’s Western Pacific Region Office. The nations also agreed to prepare contingency plans for a human flu pandemic.”We believe a pandemic is highly likely, unless intensified international efforts are made to take control of the situation,” said Dr. Shigeru Omi, WHO western Pacific regional director, in the press release. “When I contemplate the ‘where, how, and when’ of a possible influenza pandemic, I find myself faced with an inescapable conclusion—that we who are assembled in this room have an historic role to play in addressing a global health threat that continues in our region.”In a Nov 29 speech in Hong Kong, Omi predicted that a pandemic could cause 20 million to 50 million deaths, or possibly up to 100 million, according to a Nov 29 New York Times report.Omi’s opinion that a pandemic is highly likely was echoed in a report released recently by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. “The danger mounts as the world’s capacity to produce vaccines shrinks and H5N1 reaches endemic levels in poultry in many parts of Asia,” says the report, titled “The Threat of Pandemic Influenza: Are We Ready?” The 300-page report is a summary of a conference held in June.Meanwhile, members of ASEAN are addressing local avian flu problems.Thai government officials made several recent announcements about progress against H5N1, although they encountered setbacks as well. They announced that a vaccine to protect humans against avian flu is expected to be ready by 2007, following clinical trials in Thailand, according to an Associated Press story Nov 24. A Dec 1 story from the Thai News Agency said the government was claiming success in efforts to prevent the H5N1 virus from mutating. The same story noted the plans have not worked everywhere because villagers sometimes hid news of dying birds for fear of having their flocks culled.In addition, the story said authorities in northern Thailand’s Chiang Mai province will meet with owners of cock-fighting rings later this month to discuss reopening rings and how to prevent fighting cocks from spreading H5N1. An 18-year-old Thai man who often sucked fluids from the mouths of his fighting birds died from H5N1, according to a New York Times story on Nov 7.Thailand reported to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) that between Nov 18 and 25 it logged 17 new H5N1 outbreaks, leading to the deaths of more than 16,000 fowl.Hong Kong authorities said on Nov 29 they may bar shopkeepers from slaughtering poultry, a popular practice for assuring shoppers that their purchases are fresh, according to a story compiled from news agencies and published on the China Daily web site yesterday.Scientists have struggled against the practice of killing chickens at markets since Hong Kong’s first bout with human H5N1, which killed six people in 1997. The poultry industry has strongly opposed the ban in the past, the China Daily report said. However, the government is pursuing the plan, which could include creating one large central slaughterhouse or limiting the slaughter to a few areas, the story said.See also:IOM report “The Threat of Pandemic Influenza: Are We Ready? Workshop Summary”http://www.nap.edu/books/0309095042/html/last_img read more

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Conference “Sustainable Beach Management”

first_imgThe Administrative Department for Tourism of the County of Istria and the Institute for Agriculture and Tourism are organizing a conference called “SUSTAINABLE BEACH MANAGEMENT”.The conference will be held in Thursday, March 15, 2018 in Poreč, Hotel Diamant, Magnolia Hall. Study visits to cities and beaches in Porec and Novigrad will be organized in Friday, March 16, 2018The conference is organized to encourage public dialogue on responsible and sustainable beach management in Istria, and will present concrete examples from cities and municipalities in the Region of Tuscany, Cyprus and the County of Istria in which the model is tested and implemented. The Green Beach model is an example of a sustainable beach management model in the Mediterranean. “We believe that the conference is an excellent platform for the further development of this valuable resource in the function of considering further tourism development. The conference is primarily intended for local self-government units and hotel companies, that is, for all those who manage beaches and tourist boards that deal with the promotion and improvement of tourist destinations. ” stand out from the Institute of Agriculture and Tourism.Due to the limited number of participants, their arrival should be confirmed no later than Friday, 9. March 2018. with the exact date of arrival (March 15 and / or March 16, 2018). Applications for participation are submitted to the e-mail address: anovoselic@iptpo.hr or phone number 052 / 408-309.Conference program SUSTAINABLE BEACH MANAGEMENTOrganisers:Administrative Department for Tourism of the County of Istria and the Institute of Agriculture and Tourismin cooperation with the City of Poreč and the City of NovigradDate:15.-16. March 2018Location:Lectures (March 15, 3) Hotel Diamant, conference hall Magnolia, PorečStudy visits (March 16, 3) Tours of cities and beaches in Poreč and Novigrad15. March 2018.ProgramModerator: dr. Sc. Danijela Poljuha, Institute of Agriculture and Tourism8: 45-9: 15 Registration9: 15-9: 45 Official opening of the conferencemr. sc. Valter Flego, County Prefect of Istriadr. sc. Dean Ban, director of the Institute of Agriculture and Tourism9: 45-10: 00 Review of Istrian tourism 2017Denis Ivošević, Director of the Office of the Istria County Tourist Board10: 00-10: 15 Encouraging sustainable tourism development in the Mediterranean (EU project MITOMED +)dr. sc. Kristina Brščić, Institute of Agriculture and Tourism10: 15-10: 30 Models of integrated tourism in the Mediterranean Plus – MITOMED +Maria Luisa Mattivi, Project Manager, Economic and Tourism Promotion Sector, Region of Tuscany10: 30-11: 00 Presentation of the model “Green Beach” – Cyprusdr. sc. Eudokia Balamou, ANETEL, Larnaca, Cyprus11: 00-11: 30 Coffee break11: 30-11: 45 Presentation of the “Green Beach” from Tuscany – Commune di San VincenzoSimina Chelaru, San Vincenzo Municipality Urban Planning Office11: 45-12: 00 Presentation of the “Green Beach” from Tuscany – Comune di MontignosoRaffaello Gianfranceschi, Councilor of the Municipality of Montignoso12: 15-12: 30 Presentation of the “Green Beach” from Tuscany – Castiglione della PescaiaElena Nappi, Deputy Mayor of the Municipality of Castiglione della Pescaia12: 30-14: 00 Lunch break14: 00-14: 15 Presentation of the research of attitudes and satisfaction of tourists with the destination according toETIS questionnaire (destinations Poreč, Novigrad, Labin / Rabac)dr. sc. Kristina Brščić, Institute of Agriculture and Tourism14: 15-14: 30 Survey results – Green beaches (Novigrad, Rabac, Poreč)Tina Šugar, M.Sc. ing. agr., Institute of Agriculture and Tourism14: 30-14: 45 Green beach – town of NovigradVanja Gorički, B.Sc. oec., advisor for EU projects and international cooperation of the City of Novigrad14: 45-15: 00 Green beach – RabacRobert Mohorović, mag.oec., Senior expert associate for international projects of the City of Labin15: 00-15: 15 Green beach – the city of Porecdr. sc. Damir Hrvatin, Head of the Administrative Department for Spatial Planning and Environmental Protection of the City of Poreč15: 15-15: 30 Discussion and closing of the conference16. March 2018.Study visits8:30 – 10:30 Tour of the city of Poreč, tour of the beach “Gradsko kupalište”11: 00-12: 30 Tour of the city of Novigrad, tour of the beach “Karpinjan”English and Italian translation providedlast_img read more

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On the crest of a wave

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Sacked Chesterton chiefs hit back

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Rodgau go-ahead

first_imgAPPROVAL of a financing package worth DM605m has cleared the way for two extensions to the Rhein-Main S-Bahn network south of Frankfurt to be completed by the June 2001 timetable change. Work on upgrading German Railway’s two ’Rodgau’ branches began at the end of 1994 (RG 1.95 p14), but progress has been delayed by cost increases from the DM360m budget.The project covers double-tracking of the 20·5 km Offenbach Ost – Ober-Roden line and 9·8 km of the 10·9 km branch from Offenbach-Bieber to Diezenbach, currently closed to passengers. Both lines will be electrified at 15 kV 16 2??3 Hz to allow the extension of routes S1 to Ober-Roden and S2 to Dietzenbach. The stations will be provided with 960mm high platforms 210m long, and 17 level crossings will be eliminated. olast_img read more

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Justice to Victims of Abortionist Kermit Gosnell

first_img“The murders of babies and of at least one woman at the hands of Gosnell could have been prevented had the Pennsylvania health department inspected the Gosnell facility immediately after receiving numerous complaints. Instead, the department ignored the dangerous conditions for 17 years. In order to protect women like Karnamaya Mongar and prevent infanticide from being practiced in this country, Congress must work with states to require abortion clinics to apply the same safety standards as those followed by other medical facilities, including veterinary offices. “For too long, abortion facilities have been allowed to self-regulate. Since these atrocities have been made public, other clinics, such as Planned Parenthood of Wilmington, Delaware, have had to shut their doors due to the discovery of unsafe and unsanitary conditions. These recent closings are indicative of a more widespread problem.… “The lack of concern for both unborn babies and babies that survive an abortion is not an attitude isolated to Kermit Gosnell. More recent reports show other abortionists have no respect for human life and are willing to kill babies very late-term or even let babies who are born alive die. One report reveals LeRoy Carhart aborted an unborn baby at 33-weeks gestation in February, and sadly the mother later died from complications. Another report shows D.C. abortionist Cesare Santangelo admitting he would let a child who survives an abortion die.http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130513-910685.html?mod=googlenews_wsj Family Research Council 13 May 2013Anna Higgins, J.D., director of the Center for Human Dignity at the Family Research Council (FRC), commented today on the conviction of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, who performed hundreds of late term abortions and was convicted of the murder of three babies born alive and involuntary manslaughter of Karnamaya Mongar among other charges.“The jury’s verdict in the trial of abortionist Kermit Gosnell brings a just conclusion to a horrific case.“The Gosnell case serves to highlight two major problems with the abortion industry in this country — its callous disregard for the health and safety of women and the inhumanity of abortion, especially late-term abortion.“The murders of babies and of at least one woman at the hands of Gosnell could have been prevented had the Pennsylvania health department inspected the Gosnell facility immediately after receiving numerous complaints. Instead, the department ignored the dangerous conditions for 17 years. In order to protect women like Karnamaya Mongar and prevent infanticide from being practiced in this country, Congress must work with states to require abortion clinics to apply the same safety standards as those followed by other medical facilities, including veterinary offices.last_img read more

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Rigsby eagerly awaits postseason debut

first_imgAfter spending half the year recovering from a hip injury that required surgery, Rigsby is nothing but excited for her first postseason.[/media-credit]It’s playoff time. The time of year when players show they either have it, or they don’t. Whether their nerves will get the best of them, or they won’t. When the seniors try to make their last entry into the history books and when the freshman learn about the true meaning of playoff hockey.But if you talked to UW freshman goaltender Alex Rigsby, it would be hard to tell the pressures of playoff hockey are imminent.“I’m really excited for this weekend. It’ll be great,” Rigsby said. “Everyone says how loud it gets up at the Eagles Nest and I’m just excited to get the playoffs started. I’ve been looking forward to this the entire season.”Not nervous, worried, anxious, terrified, mortified, petrified, stupefied or any other kind of -fied. Just excited.It’s that type of attitude the up-and-coming netminder has carried with her throughout the regular season. Rigsby possesses a game and a confidence that has vaulted her name into third on the WCHA conference stat sheet in goals against average (1.79) and first in winning percentage (.913).The freshman wasn’t afforded an easy path to success this season either. Last summer Rigsby sustained a hip injury that required surgery, which she didn’t fully recover from until halfway through this year.In the beginning of the season, the longer recovery time after games led to a lot of split starts with her counterpart sophomore goaltender Becca Ruegsegger. But as the season wore on, Rigsby grew stronger and was eventually able to start multiple games in a row.“I’m feeing great now,” Rigsby said. “There’s nothing holding me back from playing my game. I’m feeling great from my injury so I’ve just continued to work on that and just make sure I don’t go back to how I was at the beginning of the season.”The Badgers are set to begin their playoff run against St. Cloud State this weekend at Verona’s Eagle’s Nest Ice Arena in the first round of the WCHA conference tournament. Head coach Mark Johnson will likely test Rigsby’s ability to go on back-to-back nights once again.“If you look at my track record, generally, we play one goalie during the playoffs,” Johnson said.Considering the statistics the freshman has put up this season, there’s a great chance Rigsby will get the call.Johnson says he isn’t averse to switching out Rigsby for Ruegsegger during the playoff run, but most head coaches are hesitant to pull a netminder when they are in the midst of a hot streak.In Rigsby’s last four starts, she has allowed a combined total of three goals with two shut outs.According to sophomore defenseman Stefanie McKeough, each goaltender plays their position in a different manner.Rigsby, for instance, uses her voice to assert herself.“Rigsby is very vocal,” McKeough said. “If she can’t see in front of the net, she will yell at us to move them. She’s not afraid to yell at us.”It doesn’t appear Rigsby is afraid of much.She wasn’t afraid of playing with the guys when in 2009 she was the first female ever selected by a USHL team.She doesn’t appear to be phased by the big moments as her game gets better while the stakes get higher.Rigsby has improved through every stage of the regular season. According to the freshman, she has gone into every practice with a different aspect of her game to improve upon and the results of the hard work have come on the ice.If Johnson decides to go with Rigsby in the playoffs and the pregame jitters do finally reach the doorstep of her mind, in Johnson’s eyes, that’s just fine.“It’s okay to be nervous, it’s okay to have butterflies. If you don’t then there is something wrong with you,” Johnson said.last_img read more

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Just Like any Good Recipe, Early Prep is Key for Thanksgiving…

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington State Department of TransportationWhile making plans for the big holiday feast, be sure to add travel prep to the Thanksgiving to-do list. The Washington State Department of Transportation urges all travelers to “know before you go” and plan head for smoother travel during the busy holiday weekend.The agency also provides several tools to help plan holiday travels:Consult WSDOT’s travel times charts, which use historical information to help drivers know before they go.Check out online tools, including mobile apps, traffic cameras and email alerts.Visit WSDOT’s online traveler information about traffic, weather and ferry schedules.Follow WSDOT’s social media accounts, such as Twitter and Facebook.Pre-program 530 AM and 1610 AM to vehicle radios for highway advisory radio alerts.Carry chains and other winter driving essentials.Check current chain and traction requirements on the WSDOT passes website or by calling 5-1-1, and watch for highway advisory signs.Leave extra time for holiday and winter travel, slow down and leave extra space between vehicles when driving on snow or ice.Apple Cup travelThose traveling to the Friday, Nov. 23, Apple Cup football game in Pullman should prepare for possible winter weather on passes and allow extra travel time. A detour on State Route 26 near Othello – the main route to Pullman from the west side of the state – will continue for the holiday weekend to allow concrete to cure. The detour adds 15 minutes to the normal drive, but travelers should prepare for delays during heavy holiday or game-day traffic. Westbound traffic on I-90 at Snoqualmie Pass both Saturday, Nov. 24, and Sunday, Nov. 25, is likely to be heavier than normal with both game and holiday travelers, so please allow extra time or alter travel plans if possible.Mountain passesSR 123 Cayuse Pass and SR 410 Chinook Pass remain open as of Nov. 15, but check the winter closure webpage for updates before traveling because conditions could cause the passes to close before the holiday.SR 20 North Cascades Highway also remains open as of Nov. 15 and details about the road status and winter closure also are available online.On Interstate 90 Snoqualmie Pass travelers can receive text alerts for pass delays of 30 minutes or longer – text “wsdot snoqualmie” to 468311 to subscribe, and “wsdot stop” to unsubscribe.TollsIn the Puget Sound area, the SR 520 bridge will have weekend toll rates on Thanksgiving, Nov. 22, returning to weekday rates on Friday, Nov. 23. On the I-405 express toll lanes, travel is free for all on the Thanksgiving holiday, returning to normal toll and HOV requirements from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday. Weekends are always free to travel in the express toll lanes. Out-of-town travelers, including those using rental cars, can learn about toll roads and short term account options on the Good to Go! visitors page.Other travel alternativesTravelers planning a trip by ferry, train, personal aircraft or bus also should make plans to avoid holiday delays:Please plan ahead for heavy holiday ferry traffic and consider purchasing tickets online to save time. The longest lines are expected westbound Wednesday afternoon and evening, Nov. 21, and eastbound Friday morning, Nov. 23. Reservations are recommended on the Anacortes/San Juan Islands/Sidney, British Columbia and Port Townsend/Coupeville routes. Some ferry routes run on Saturday schedules on the holiday; check ferry schedules online or call 888-808-7977 for details.Amtrak Cascades passengers are encouraged to purchase tickets early and should plan to arrive at the station one hour before departure. There are no extra Thanksgiving trains this year. All Amtrak Cascades trains require reservations and trains fill up quickly during holidays. Visit amtrakcascades.com/ or call 800–USA–RAIL for details.Information about traveling via state-operated airports is available on line or call 800-552-0666.Check with local public transit agencies for any holiday schedule or service changes, including some Dial-A-Ride and fixed-route service that may not run on holidays.last_img read more

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Holmdel Mayor Critelli Denies Conflict of Interest

first_imgBy Christina Johnson HOLMDEL – During a meeting of the governing body Tuesday, Mayor Thomas Critelli read aloud a statement denying allegations he has a conflict of interest concerning a property formerly owned by his development company. That property is currently included in the township’s plan to satisfy its affordable housing obligation.In Dec. 2015, court records show that Danitom Development, Inc., a company co-owned by Critelli and associate Mike Guerra, signed a purchase agreement for a Holmdel property located on North Beers Street near Bayshore Medical Center.That purchase agreement – not be confused with a binding bill of sale – allowed Critelli the flexibility to assign all of the rights, duties, benefits and obligations of the property under that contract to another company in Dec. 2016.That company is Hackensack Investment LLC, an organization owned by his associate, Guerra, says Lea Shave, a resident who is running for Township Committee as an independent.“You bought the property in 2015, and sold it in 2016, that’s an entire year you had that property and were possibly involved in COAH discussions as a committee member,” Shave added, referring to affordable housing obligation planning. “I don’t see that as a rookie mistake. I see that as someone who was possibly taking advantage of development. I think this is a symptom of a lack of transparency and entitlement adopted by our Township Committee.”Shave initiated these allegations against Critelli last week, when she posted photos of public court documents on her Facebook page ElectLeaShave.At the public meeting, Critelli refuted the claim, stating that after Danitom entered the purchase agreement, “I realized as a member of the Township Committee it was better for me to not own investment property in Holmdel to avoid any potential conflict of interest.”By completing the divestiture in 2016, Critelli said he eliminated himself from having any potential conflict of interest in the property and “extinguished any conflict that could have arisen from having an interest in the property moving forward.”In 2017 the Township Committee took two actions relating to COAH, including a vote on a proposed affordable housing settlement agreement and zoning pertaining to affordable housing.Critelli noted that he did not take part in any of those votes and said, “Had I been at the voting meetings I would have placed a recusal on the record out of abundance of caution.”Resident Barbara Singer, a Democrat who is running for Township Committee, said she has no problem with members of the Township Committee conducting business in town or investing in property, “but there is a right way and wrong way to conduct that business.”“There are numerous statements on file about the political gains going on in Holmdel that have not only delayed the finalization of an affordable housing agreement, but have interfered in the ongoing business of others who have tried to seek investments in Holmdel,” Singer added. “I appreciate that you recused yourself from votes regarding COAH, but there have been discussions going on for years that you have been a party to while you were indeed the person on that purchase contract.”Critelli said the only reason an issue has been raised is because in 2017, after the Township Committee approved an affordable housing settlement and that agreement proceeded to litigation, another developer interested in COAH-related properties in Holmdel voiced concerns about the mayor’s past involvement with the North Beers Street parcel.“At the time it went to court a developer raised a concern in a public court filing, which was recently publicized by one of my political opponents. This is not news,” Critelli said.Critelli said that in response to the developer’s concerns he filed a sworn statement under penalty of perjury explaining his 2016 divestiture and certified that neither himself, his immediate family, nor any business he is associated with had any financial interest or stake in the property.Township Administrator Donna M. Vieiro said an update on the status of Holmdel’s COAH litigation is expected to be made public during an upcoming meeting of the governing body in October or November.This article was first published in the Oct. 11-18, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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