Category: dalewwjn

Draker Labs grew more than 250 percent in 2011

first_imgDraker Laboratories, the industry’s leading independent provider of turnkey monitoring solutions for commercial and utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) projects, today announced several key highlights and major milestones reached in 2011.‘The past year has further demonstrated the increasing role of solar PV projects in helping the United States and the world meet growing demand for renewable energy generation,’ said Charles ‘Chach’ Curtis, CEO of Draker Labs. ‘We are proud to serve this dynamic market with our industry-leading monitoring and control solutions which allow commercial and utility-scale solar PV systems to achieve optimal performance and maximize financial returns for project developers.’Building on its exceptional performance in 2010, Draker again achieved record growth by more than tripling its revenue in 2011. In the past year, Draker has grown its installed base to over 500 monitored sites generating over 400MW of peak power. Draker now has customer sites coast to coast across North America from New Jersey to Florida to Ontario to California. Draker customer sites range in size from 50kW commercial rooftop solar systems to 30MW utility-scale PV power plants.Major 2011 Draker achievements included the following:â ¢ 2nd consecutive year of greater than 250% revenue growthâ ¢ Extension of its monitoring solutions to include real-time monitoring and control of grid intertie switchgear for utility-scale PV power plantsâ ¢ Successful implementation of over 100 MW of utility scale PV power plants monitoring and control systems ranging in size up to 30 MWâ ¢ Launch of the Solar Prospectorâ ¢ Site Assessment System, a turnkey solar resource assessment solution for PV developers who need bankable energy projections to secure project financingâ ¢ Expansion of staff to over 50 employees with key additions in executive management, direct sales, customer support, engineering and product developmentâ ¢ Quadrupling of software development team to scale its database and application architectures to accelerate roll out of new servicesâ ¢ Relocation to larger offices in both its Vermont and California locationsâ ¢ Strengthening its balance sheet with the addition of $3 million in follow-on equity financing and a new $1.5 million line facility‘2011 was a great year for solar PV project implementation and another record year for Draker,’ Curtis said. ‘We at Draker are looking forward to an even better 2012, as we continue to serve our growing base of domestic and international customers.’About Draker Draker Laboratories provides accurate and highly reliable monitoring solutions that help owners and operators of commercial and utility-scale PV systems maximize the efficiency and profitability of their solar assets. As a supplier of end-to-end monitoring solutions, Draker’s turnkey systems combine proven field instrumentation with an intuitive web-based data management system and unmatched customer support. For more information, please visit www.drakerlabs.com(link is external)BURLINGTON, VT ‘ January 5, 2012 ‘last_img read more

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Letter from the Editor: The Homelessness Hero, November 2014

first_imgThe Homelessness HeroA few years ago, I decided to go homeless for three days. It was an artificial homelessness, because I knew that after 72 hours I could go back to a warm bed and a fridge full of food. But the people I met — and the misery they experience — were very real. They were not the lazy alcoholics and drug addicts I’d assumed them to be. They were ordinary people looking desperately for jobs but not getting them, mainly because they had no permanent address. Many had kids whom they called from payphones. All were ashamed of their situation.I decided to go homeless because I wanted to feel human again. For a few days, I wanted to close the widening gap between rich and poor, suburbanite and street dweller. Wealthy Americans consume over half of the world’s resources, while one billion people starve. Within our own borders, 3.5 million Americans sleep on the streets or in shelters each night, and nearly 20 percent of Americans go hungry. Most of them are children.For too long, I’d rationalized away these kinds of statistics: they need to get jobs and make better choices, I figured. It wasn’t until I spent three days on the streets that I realized the hollowness of my rationalizations. These facts have faces. These people are human beings, just like me.Homeless people are the ultimate endurance athletes and outdoor adventurists, I discovered. They hike for miles every day and camp out under the stars each night. They can start a campfire with a single match and a few twigs, and they can forage for food and wild edibles better than most mushroom-gathering hippies. They are thru-hikers without a Katahdin, trudging daily through rain and snow in search of their next meal or job interview.I wrote about my homeless experience for the magazine last year. The story received some decent feedback and thought-provoking chatter on the site, and I figured that was the end of it.But then an amazing thing happened. After reading the story, an avid outdoor enthusiast from Virginia named Chris Finlay decided to do something about it. He started a nonprofit called Shelters to Shutters, which provides housing and employment to the homeless. It’s a sustainable, scalable model built upon partnerships with apartment companies throughout the region. Shelters to Shutters now assists the homeless in several cities in North Carolina and Tennessee with plans to expand beyond the Blue Ridge.As a writer for over two decades, I’ve published hundreds of stories. Rarely do I see any lasting impact from them. It’s incredibly heartening to know that there are people like Chris Finlay, who find inspiration and then act on it.I am deeply grateful to all of the Chris Finlays out there who don’t just read about problems but do the hard work of creating solutions. Their stories don’t always get told; they’re often too busy working behind the scenes to help others or protect species or safeguard rivers. But they are the true heroes of our mountains and our magazine.last_img read more

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What Todd Gloria, San Diego’s New Mayor, Hopes to Accomplish in Office

first_imgThis week, I spoke with Mr. Gloria about his win and his priorities. Here’s our conversation, lightly edited and condensed:Tell me about how you’re feeling and what it means to have all these historic distinctions, especially in the context of Kamala Harris’s win. As a native San Diegan, this feels particularly sweet because growing up, I didn’t see a lot of people like me in government and that is now changing. And I think about what this accomplishment may mean for children of color, young L.G.B.T.Q. youth, who question if there’s a place for them in the city. And I hope that my election tells them that there is, if they’re willing to work hard.- Advertisement – It often feels like a smaller town, though — especially in its local politics. As the Voice of San Diego reported recently, its mayor-elect, Todd Gloria, currently a state assemblyman, aims to change that.Mr. Gloria will be the city’s first mayor of color and first openly gay mayor.He may also be the most powerful mayor the city has ever had, The Los Angeles Times reported, as a Democrat leading a Democratic-majority council in the city’s “strong mayor” system. (Mayor Kevin Faulconer is known as a moderate Republican, more in line with past mayors. And he will be termed out.)- Advertisement – I’m hopeful that a Biden-Harris administration will be a better partner from a federal perspective, particularly as it relates to very low-income housing, Section 8, public housing.But from a local level, there’s a lot we can do.San Diego has long had a low-income housing trust fund, and that has successfully financed and built thousands of low-income housing units. I believe it’s time that we create a middle-income housing trust. That would construct housing that is priced for working- and middle-class people — the folks who don’t earn enough for the market rate housing being built, but earn too much to qualify for the low-income programs that currently exist.I think where we start to see opposition is when people feel that houses are being constructed without adequate infrastructure to protect quality of life.That’s where we have to focus some of our time and attention to make sure that this density happens in these communities where it makes the most sense, that those communities are receiving the investment in parks and mobility and other assets to make sure that what they like about their community is actually enhanced.San Diego County was just moved into the most restrictive purple tier of the state’s reopening plan after hanging on in the red tier for weeks. What’s your reaction to that? And how are you thinking about the city’s role in the response?Obviously, it’s regrettable. And I know there are a lot of small businesses that are very concerned about this development, and particularly the sort of whipsaw back and forth, being open and being closed. That kind of uncertainty is bad for business generally. But it may be deadly. The only solution is to contain the virus.The city can play a cooperative role in this effort by making sure that we continue to fight whatever pandemic fatigue there is, reinforce messaging around our individual responsibility to our collective challenge. And as much as we talk a lot about business — and it’s understandable — I feel that we need to talk more about schools. In San Diego, where the city does not oversee the school district, there’s historically been a temptation to say that is therefore not our responsibility. I’m not willing to say that — it goes back to the small town, big city thing. You know, if you’re in the business of building a great city, you can’t do it without good schools.[See California coronavirus case counts.]Right now, our public schools are largely closed. And that’s because they can’t provide the testing and personal protective equipment and other precautions that are necessary to safely reopen.I think that through working with the county, the state, the federal government, and I think particularly working with the creative relationship with the University of California, San Diego, that we can provide more resources, specifically in the form of testing, to allow our schools to more safely reopen.I think that is going to be critical for businesses to reopen, for employees to be able to go back to work, to ultimately get our economy reopened.(This article is part of the California Today newsletter. Sign up to get it delivered to your inbox.)California Today goes live at 6:30 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com. Were you forwarded this email? Sign up for California Today here and read every edition online here.Jill Cowan grew up in Orange County, graduated from U.C. Berkeley and has reported all over the state, including the Bay Area, Bakersfield and Los Angeles — but she always wants to see more. Follow along here or on Twitter.California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley. [See California election results.]Can you say more about what you mean when you say, and I’m paraphrasing, that San Diego is a big city, so it should act like one?So I hate to start with a negative, but it doesn’t mean turning San Diego into Los Angeles. In fact, it’s in my DNA to resist that.But here are a couple of quick examples of what I do mean: A good chunk of the primary election was spent debating vacation rentals and scooters. And these are our issues, but they’re not the biggest issues, and frankly, they’re issues other cities have successfully addressed. And we have not.Another example is we’re spending more than we ever have on homelessness, but we’re not seeing the progress that San Diegans expect. And I think that’s largely because we’re not spending the money in following national best practices.We’re doing things like buying indoor skydiving facilities to convert into homeless services centers that don’t have any housing. That’s small-town thinking in a big city.I want to talk more about housing. I saw that you didn’t support S.B. 50, for instance, but you’ve been supportive of zoning for greater density in some areas. What’s your plan?From where I sit as a state legislator, I see San Diego making efforts and I see a lot of cities doing nothing. So the state’s involvement in this, I think, is important. [Read the background on California’s key races this election.]I’m sure you’ve been over this, but for those of us who aren’t fortunate enough to live in San Diego, can you tell me about your background?So my background is a little more complex and I love our vice president-elect because she’s making “multiracial” understandable. I remember growing up and basically having Tiger Woods and Mariah Carey to point to.I describe myself as being a quintessential San Diegan. I am Native American, Filipino, Puerto Rican and Dutch. And the way that happened is that all four of my grandparents came to San Diego because of the military and to work in the defense industry.You have these people from these very different backgrounds who are able to come here and make a life for themselves and I worry very much that stories like theirs are not replicable in San Diego in 2020. My public service is about trying to make sure those pathways of opportunity continue to exist. Good morning.San Diego is California’s second biggest city. Its population of roughly 1.4 million also makes it the nation’s eighth biggest city, just after San Antonio and before Dallas.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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The great T20 XI that never was: Historical cricketers who would have loved shortest form | Cricket News

first_img– Advertisement – Graeme Pollock (South Africa)Pollock’s Test career, which was ended at the age of 26 by South Africa’s exile from international cricket, was already a great one. In his 23 Tests he had scored 2,256 runs at an average of 60.97. His off-side play was elegant and the fact that he was a stroke-maker always gave the bowler hope that they might end up having the better of him, but few did. In 1974 he scored the first double-hundred in List A cricket, with his unbeaten 222 remaining one of the highest individual scores in that form of the game to this day.Zaheer Abbas (Pakistan)By the time he retired, the man universally known as ‘Zed’ was renowned as one of the most elegant players of all time and the first – and so far, only – batsman from the subcontinent to score a hundred first‐class centuries. His ODI record was superb, averaging 47.62 at a strike rate of 84.80, and he was the first player to score three successive centuries in that form of the game. To put that into context, the overall strike rate in ODI cricket over the course of his career was just 70.60 – a far cry from the exaggerated scoring rates of modern times – so he was scoring 20 per cent faster than the average batsman over that period.Denis Compton (England)Compton was possibly the first ‘film star’ cricketer, with looks to match his talent on the field. As a batsman he had all the strokes, and memorably played his famous sweep shot to regain the Ashes at The Oval in 1953 after they had been in Australian hands for 19 years. The following year, he struck his highest Test score of 278 against Pakistan at Trent Bridge, which included 173 runs between lunch and tea on the second day – still the record for the most runs by an individual in a single session of play in a Test. He could bowl, too, taking 622 first‐class wickets with his left‐arm wrist‐spin. – Advertisement – West Indies legend Clyde Walcott's powerful batting would have seen him succeed in Twenty20 cricket, says Benedict Bermange
West Indies legend Clyde Walcott's powerful batting would have seen him succeed in Twenty20 cricket, says Benedict Bermange

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India sees record 49,000 new coronavirus cases, drug shortages in places

first_imgIndia reported over 49,000 fresh cases of the novel coronavirus with 740 new deaths on Friday, marking the biggest daily surge in cases even as officials in some states complained of shortages of vital drugs for those hospitalized.As the number of cases neared 1.3 million in India, local authorities scrambled to procure generic versions of remdesivir, the drug that has shown promise in clinical trials in treating severely-ill patients with COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.”Demand is huge as cases are rising rapidly in the state,” said a senior drug regulatory official in the western state of Maharashtra. “Supplies of the drug are limited, but companies have assured us they will provide more in a week.” India has reported 30,601 deaths from the disease, with more than 40% of these deaths coming from Maharashtra state.The western state is the worst-affected, having recorded nearly 350,000 cases, of which almost 60% were reported in the country’s financial capital, Mumbai, and its satellite towns.Remdesivir, made by the US drugmaker Gilead Sciences Inc , has been in high demand globally amid the pandemic, and Gilead in May and June authorized six Indian companies, and three foreign ones, to make and sell generic versions of the drug in 127 developing nations.Only three of these firms with operations in India – Hetero Labs Ltd, Cipla and Mylan NV have so far been able to start supplying. Others are either awaiting regulatory approvals or still setting up production. Topics :center_img Several hospitals have struggled to get the drug as patient numbers increased in a county whose public health system is one of the world’s most poorly-funded. India has the third-highest number of coronavirus cases after the United States and Brazil.Drug industry and government officials in the country said that they are doing their best.”These things cannot be done in a hurry,” said P.D. Vaghela, an official at India’s Department of Pharmaceuticals, adding the drug regulator was working on granting approvals to companies for generic remdesivir at the earliest.”Some people were engaging in black marketing but we have taken strict action against them,” Vaghela said.last_img read more

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Ryder Cup postponed to 2021 due to coronavirus

first_img Promoted ContentThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreSome Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That ExistPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D GraffitiTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?17 Mind-Blowing Makeovers By Makeup Artist Vanessa Davis9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny8 Things You Didn’t Know About Coffee7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value “We considered all options, including playing with a limited attendance, but all our stakeholders agreed this would dilute the magic of this great occasion,” Europe’s Ryder Cup director Guy Kinnings said. US captain Steve Stricker and Europe counterpart Padraig Harrington agreed it would be better to wait than stage a Ryder Cup without spectators. “When you think of the Ryder Cup, you think of the distinctive atmosphere generated by the spectators, such as around the first tee at Le Golf National two years’ ago,” Harrington said. “If that cannot be responsibly recreated at Whistling Straits in September, then it is correct that we all wait until it can be.” Stricker, a Wisconsin native, agreed, saying, “While it is disappointing the Ryder Cup won’t be played this year, the decision to reschedule is the right thing to do under the circumstances. Now we have the opportunity to showcase the event as it was meant to be seen.” Both sides will examine how rosters will be assembled, with Europe’s qualifying process frozen until January 2021, Harrington saying golfers should not feel extra pressure to play now given COVID-19 issues. The return to odd-numbered years means Bethpage Black near New York will host in 2025 and the 100th anniversary edition of the Ryder Cup will be played at Ireland’s Adare Manor in 2027. The Presidents Cup change means the US PGA’s Wells Fargo Championship will be played next year at Quail Hollow but move to TPC Potomac in suburban Washington DC in 2022 while the team event is played at the Charlotte, North Carolina, layout. Loading… Read Also: Ighalo thrilled as Pogba, James show off dancing skills (video) The British Open, originally scheduled for next week at Royal St. George’s, was called off due to COVID-19. The Masters was rescheduled from April to November while the PGA Championship switched from May to August and the US Open moved from June to September. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 This year’s Ryder Cup golf showdown between Europe and the United States was postponed to 2021 on Wednesday, becoming the latest major sports event disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. The PGA of America, Ryder Cup Europe and the US PGA Tour announced the 43rd edition of the biennial matches, which had been set for Whistling Straits in Wisconsin on September 25-27, will instead be staged on September 24-26, 2021. Safety concerns rose as COVID-19 cases continue to soar across the United States and no one involved wanted to stage a Ryder Cup without the passionate crowds whose cheers and songs animate an atmosphere unique in golf. “As disappointing as this is, our mandate to do all we can to safeguard public health is what matters most,” PGA of America chief executive officer Seth Waugh said. “The spectators who support both the US and European sides are what make the Ryder Cup such a unique and compelling event and playing without them was not a realistic option.” A planned 2021 Presidents Cup between a US squad and the non-European Internationals team at Quail Hollow will be delayed until September 22-25, 2022, with a Ryder Cup in Rome pushed back a year to 2023. The postponement is the first for the Ryder Cup since 2001, when September 11 terrorist attacks upon New York and Washington prompted the matches to be delayed a year. The Cup also went unplayed from 1939-1945 due to World War II. Holders Europe will keep for another year the trophy won in France in 2018. The worldwide COVID-19 outbreak has prevented spectators from attending golf events, including US PGA Tour tournaments, after its return in June from a three-month shutdown. Guidance from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as state and local officials prompted the decision, with health considerations the top priority. “Our medical experts and the public authorities in Wisconsin could not give us certainty that conducting an event responsibly with thousands of spectators in September would be possible,” Waugh said. “Given that uncertainty, we knew rescheduling was the right call.” – ‘Right thing to do’ – World number one Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland and fellow four-time major champion Brooks Koepka of the United States were among top players who did not want a Ryder Cup without fans.last_img read more

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Bardsley: Team spirit was dead

first_img Press Association On a personal note, Bardsley continues to thrive after appearing to be on his way out of the club following the breakdown of his relationship with Di Canio. The 28-year-old full-back was sent to train with the club’s Under-21s during the summer, but since being recalled to the fold by Poyet he has made himself all but indispensable. Bardsley said: “It was probably one of the lowest points of my career, to be honest with you. But when the manager called me back into the squad, I knew I had more to offer this football club. “I’m thankful for the opportunity he gave me and I thought I had to repay him with performances. Hopefully I’m doing that.” Sunderland will entertain Southampton on Saturday having dragged themselves off the foot of the table and to within a point of safety, although what has happened behind the scenes has been just as important. Bardsley told the Sunderland Echo: “You have got to have a very good team spirit. I think that was beyond dead six months ago. Now we have dug it out. “The manager came in and gave the players a new lease of life, and everyone is taking their opportunity. That’s what you need week in, week out because there’s decent competition at the club. “When he came in, the team only had one point, but now we are on the way to getting out of it.” Four days after the home clash with the Saints, the Black Cats will head for Manchester United defending a 2-1 Capital One Cup semi-final first-leg lead, but it is the fight for top-flight survival which remains the priority. That looked a long shot just a few weeks ago, but a run of six league games which has brought just one defeat and, more importantly, two victories has rekindled belief. Bardsley said: “Absolutely, we believe we can do it. We are in our own mini-league and if we win on Saturday against Southampton, we are three points behind Hull in 10th. “That’s unbelievable when you look back three or four weeks ago. We need to just focus on ourselves and win as many games as possible.” Defender Phil Bardsley has admitted Sunderland’s team spirit was “beyond dead” under former manager Paolo Di Canio. The Italian departed after just 13 games at the helm in September last year, with morale at the club shattered following a disastrous start to the season. By the time Gus Poyet replaced him, the Black Cats had collected just a single point from their opening seven Barclays Premier League games, and although it has been far from plain sailing since, the Uruguayan has sparked a significant recovery. last_img read more

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Weekend split for women’s tennis

first_imgHistory teetered on repeating itself for the Wisconsin women’s tennis team this weekend, as it played host to Penn State and Indiana. A year ago to the week, the Badgers beat the Nittany Lions 4-3 in a lengthy road match before dropping 5-2 at the hands of the Hoosiers two days later.The setting seemed to make little difference, as Wisconsin disposed of Penn State 4-3 at home this year, with the Saturday match weighing in at a remarkable five and a half hours, before No. 26 Indiana dampened the weekend festivities with a 5-2 victory over the Badgers.”For us, I felt like Michigan [last Saturday] was a low. … We made some adjustments, we talked about it, and I feel like Michigan State [last Sunday], Penn State [Saturday] and [Indiana] today — three matches in a row — we’ve competed hard and we’ve fought hard,” head coach Patti Henderson said. “Indiana is very good, and we fought hard. … If we continue to compete like that, we’re very close.”Saturday’s win snapped an eight-game losing streak for a Badger squad that has been riddled by injury for the bulk of the spring season. But with Sunday’s defeat marking the ninth loss in 10 matches, once realistic hopes of the team making its third trip to the NCAA tournament in as many years began to fade.”It’s really hard to say. We still have Purdue, and we still have Iowa, and those two teams are ranked teams,” Henderson said. “I’d say it’s slim, but pride is a pretty big thing.”Sophomores Morgan Tuttle and Chelsea Nusslock did each claim their second individual victories in a trifecta of efforts over the weekend, with both having notched singles wins over Michigan State last weekend before the former athlete claimed a 6-4, 6-1 come-from-behind victory against Indiana’s Alba Berdala Sunday after the latter athlete proved Saturday’s hero with a victory-clinching 6-7(3), 7-5, 7-5 win over Penn State’s Andreea Niculescu.”It feels wonderful,” Tuttle said, “[e]specially coming back from behind and knowing that I can come back.”Notably, Saturday’s Hoosier win did mark the 300th career Big Ten win for coach Lin Loring, who has racked up some 674 total victories in 29 years at the helm of Indiana.”I’m most proud of our consistency. We only have 61 conference losses with those 300 wins, so it’s just year in and year out, we’ve been pretty competitive,” Loring said. “A lot of people get the credit. I’ve just been driving the ship for 29 years.”Meanwhile, this weekend looks to be the final frame in which the Badgers will be forced to compete sans team ace Caitlin Burke, who has been out of action since February with a rib injury she sustained in play against Notre Dame. When the Badgers travel to Iowa and Minnesota next week, Burke looks to be off the sidelines and back on the court.”I’m practicing [Monday] for the first time in a while, so we’ll see how my rib is feeling and go from there,” Burke said. “And if it’s feeling good, I’ll be playing this weekend.”last_img read more

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Irish continue to challenge for honours in Vuelta

first_imgThe pan-flat 167 kilomtre route takes the riders inland from Rota to Alcalá de Guadaíra.Ireland’s Nicolas Roche is 3rd overall – 15 seconds behind race leader Esteban Chaves of Columbia.Dan Martin is 4th – 9 seconds further back.last_img

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Drop Kwarasey for Fatau- Damba

first_imgFormer Ghana goalkeeper Abubakar Damba says Fatau Dauda deserves to start in post for the Black Stars ahead of Stromsgodset Adams Kwarasey at the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations.The Ashgold goalkeeper has been on top of his game in the Ghanaian top flight and his performance in Ghana’s 3-0 victory over Egypt won him more admirers.Norway-based Kwarasey has been the number one choice for the Black Stars since Richard Kingston’s stint with Ghana ended in September, 2011.Most pundits in Ghana as well as top officials of the Ghana FA have mentioned that the two goalkeepers are almost on the same level.This is different from what happened in the past when Kingston was seen as miles ahead of the local ones.“Looking at the trend and Dauda’s performances, especially in the local league, I think he has come of age and really prepared for the challenge,” Damba told Radio XYZ. “If you look at the Egypt game, he kept a clean sheet and was very confident in post.“For me, I think Fatau Dauda is the best now and should be a starter for Ghana at the 2013 Afcon,” Damba who until last week was goalkeeper’s trainer of Accra Hearts of Oak said.The Black Stars will leave Abu Dhabi on Wednesday for South Africa ahead of their opening Group B game against Congo DR on Sunday.last_img read more

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