Category: pmjsxdxo

FSJ Figure Skating Club presents ABBA ice-show

first_imgThe Fort St. John figure skating club presents “Mamma Mia, & a Tribute to Abba” on Friday (Jan 30th) at the North Peace Arena.There will be two shows, one at 1pm and one at 7pm, featuring guest skater Ronald Lam of Coquitlam.Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for students / seniors, and free for children 5 and under. They are available at Ernie’s Sports Experts, in the Totem Mall.- Advertisement -For more info – call Shelley, at 250-785-2873.last_img

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Nottingham Forest 2-2 Ipswich Town: Antonio’s late leveller rescues hosts

first_img Michail Antonio 1 Michail Antonio scored a dramatic late equaliser at the City Ground to keep Nottingham Forest’s unbeaten record intact.Stuart Pearce’s side looked to be heading for a first defeat of the Championship season as they trailed 2-1 with 90 minutes on the clock.But Antonio headed home Henri Lansbury’s corner four minutes into added time to rescue a point for the hosts.Forest would have moved into top spot with a victory but the point takes them up to second, level on points with leaders Norwich.Ipswich, meanwhile, could have moved into third had they held on for the win but instead sit sixth.Mick McCarthy can, however, take some comfort from the fact his side extended their unbeaten run to seven matches.His side had taken the lead with a brilliant individual goal after 18 minutes – Daryl Murphy taking Cole Skuse’s pinpoint pass down expertly before cutting in from the right flank and curling a stunning effort into the bottom corner.It could have got worse for Forest as Lansbury’s woeful back pass let in Jonny Williams for a run on goal, but his progress was halted by Michael Mancienne’s superb sliding tackle that got his teammate off the hook.Town dictated proceedings up the hour mark with Forest looking a pale shadow of the side that led the Championship table earlier in the campaign.But the hosts finally shook off their lethargy and the equaliser came after 62 minutes as Robert Tesche scored with a firm header from a Lansbury corner as Ipswich’s defensive resolve crumbled.Antonio cracked a shot just wide, before Chris Burke’s curler bent narrowly past Gerken’s left-hand post as Forest sensed the game was theirs for the taking.But Ipswich hit back seven minutes later and it was Murphy again, who rose to powerfully head Tyrone Mings’ cross past Karl Darlow to the joy of 1,672 away fans.Darlow got down well to save from McGoldrick, before Forest should have levelled. A ball over the top put Antonio in on goal, but his shot was blocked on the line and from the rebound, Gerken made a superb save to deny Assombalonga with the goal at his mercy.And just as it looked like Forest’s unbeaten run was about to be halted, Antonio headed home Lansbury’s corner deep into injury time to salvage a point.last_img read more

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DONEGAL PET RESCUE HOST MUCH-NEEDED FUNDRAISING DRIVE TODAY

first_imgAn antiques and collectables fair goes ahead at the Radisson Hotel today in Letterkenny in aid of the Donegal Pet Rescue.The group which does terrific work in rescuing and rehoming animals and receive no funding.Get along and support them!  DONEGAL PET RESCUE HOST MUCH-NEEDED FUNDRAISING DRIVE TODAY was last modified: April 27th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal Pet RecueFairletterkennylast_img read more

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DDTV: BRIDIE GALLAGHER SINGING ‘A MOTHER’S LOVE’S A BLESSING’

first_imgDDTV: The great Donegal singer Bridie Gallagher passed away today aged 87. The performer from Creeslough was an international star.Here she is seen performing live just under two years ago. DDTV: BRIDIE GALLAGHER SINGING ‘A MOTHER’S LOVE’S A BLESSING’ was last modified: January 9th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Bridie GallagherCreesloughlast_img read more

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Schumer sees Dems retaking Senate

first_img “There’s going to be an attempt to nationalize this race by the Chuck Schumers and the Hillary Clintons, but ultimately the political singing senators from New York aren’t going to play that well here,” Smith said. But one political observer said Schumer’s list of seven target states in 2006 may not be as far-fetched as his detractors claim. Bruce Oppenheimer, a Vanderbilt University politics professor, said the conditions in Tennessee may be ripe for a Democratic victory. “People think this race would lean Republican, all other things being equal. But it’s in play,” said Oppenheimer. “For the Democrats, it’s certainly doable.” In part to counteract charges that Democrats are disconnected from average Americans, Schumer has for years boosted his political strength by constant public appearances throughout New York state. Every year, he has visited all of the 62 counties, talking up local issues or touting some new piece of federal funding. In 2004, that effort paid off when Schumer won all but one county. It is a strategy he is preaching to 2006 candidates. Schumer is also trying to pare his party’s message down to a few straightforward ideas. “Mostly, it’s the meat-and-potato issues: Save Social Security. Fix prescription drugs. Energy independence,” he said. Democrats are staking a large measure of their future on public dissatisfaction with the president, highlighted by the recent battle over renewing the Patriot Act. Senate Democrats forced a temporary extension instead of the permanent extension Republicans had sought. Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid gave Schumer credit for the win. “I can say, without any amount of puffing, that no one was more responsible for our working out the Patriot Act to our satisfaction and to the benefit of the country than Schumer,” Reid said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – Despite being New York’s less-famous senator, Charles Schumer stayed busy in 2005, keeping a hand – or a quote- in almost every major congressional battle. Now he is out to prove he has the strategy to elect Senate Democrats and maybe wrest control from the Republicans. Schumer, the head of Senate Democrats’ campaign efforts, said Tuesday he is focusing on seven states where he believes Democrats can take GOP-held Senate seats in 2006: Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Missouri, Montana, Tennessee and Arizona. “If the stars align right, we could actually take back the Senate,” Schumer said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake The Senate currently has 55 Republicans, 44 Democrats and one Democratic-voting independent. In 2006, there will be five open Senate seats, as well as 14 Democratic senators and 14 Republican senators seeking re-election. Schumer heads the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which had more than $22 million available according to its last campaign-funds report. That’s more than double the cash available to the National Republican Senatorial Committee. NRSC spokesman Brian Nick said Schumer’s current fundraising advantage “means zilch,” and his list of target states “is suspect at best.” The Republicans hope to replace some Democratic senators in places including Maryland, Minnesota and New Jersey. Missouri GOP strategist Lloyd Smith, who is a senior adviser to Republican incumbent Jim Talent, added that Democrats will need a lot more than a financial edge to win next year’s race in his state. last_img read more

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Cabinet mulls economy, development

first_img6 February 2013The state of South Africa’s economy and the implementation of the country’s National Development Plan will top the agenda at the special four-day Cabinet meeting which began in Pretoria on Tuesday.“It is at this meeting that we are hoping we will be able to discuss the implementation of the National Development Plan, with the understanding that the plan in some areas calls for tough decisions to be taken,” Minister for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Collins Chabane told reporters at the start of the meeting.The meeting comes at a time when there is uncertainty in the country’s mining sector, with platinum giant Amplats reporting a R6.3-billion loss and facing the threat of retrenchments.However, Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu moved to allay fears of instability in the sector when she told the 2013 Mining Indaba in Cape Town on Tuesday that South Africa was committed to creating a thriving and successful mining industry.She pointed out that the number of mines had increased from 993 in 2004 to 1 600 to date, while associated revenue grew from R98-billion in the same year to R370-billion by the end of 2011.Chabane could not say whether the situation in the mining sector would form part of discussions in the Cabinet meeting, only saying the extended meeting would discuss ways of sustaining economic growth, with a particular focus on the upcoming BRICS summit to be hosted by South Africa for the first time.Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

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South Africa’s economy: key sectors

first_imgThe key sectors that keep South Africa’s economic engine running are finance, real estate and business services, general government services, as well as trade, catering and accommodation, and manufacturing.Johannesburg is the financial centre of South Africa. The finance, real estate and business services sector is the largest sector of the country’s economy. (Image: Andrew Moore)Brand South Africa reporterSouth Africa’s economy was traditionally rooted in the primary sectors – the result of a wealth of mineral resources and favourable agricultural conditions. But recent decades have seen a structural shift in output.Since the early 1990s, economic growth has been driven mainly by the tertiary sector – which includes wholesale and retail trade, tourism and communications. Now South Africa is moving towards becoming a knowledge-based economy, with a greater focus on technology, e-commerce and financial and other services.Data source: Statistics South Africa P0441 – Gross Domestic Product (GDP), 2nd Quarter 2017The major sector of the economy is finance, real estate and business services, which contributes around 22% to GDP. Its is followed by general government services at 17%, and then the sector of wholesale, retail and motor trade, catering and accommodation at 15%. Manufacturing is fourth, at 14%.Sections in this article:ManufacturingMiningAgricultureCommunicationsTourismWholesale and retail tradeFinance and business servicesInvestment incentives ManufacturingThe bottling section of South African Breweries’ plant in Alrode, Johannesburg. (Image: Brand South Africa)South Africa has developed an established, diversified manufacturing base that has shown its resilience and potential to compete in the global economy.The manufacturing sector provides a locus for stimulating the growth of other activities, such as services, and achieving specific outcomes, such as employment creation and economic empowerment. The sector contributed 15.2% to South Africa’s GDP in 2013, making it the third-largest contributor to the nation’s economy.Manufacturing is dominated by industries such as agro-processing, automotive, chemicals, information and communication technology, electronics, metals, textiles, clothing and footwear.Underpinning this sector is the Department of Trade and Industry’s (DTI) Industrial Policy Action Plan (Ipap), which aims to achieve structural development and to increase competitiveness of South African manufacturing. Agro-processingSouth Africa exhibits a wide range of climates – from semi-arid and dry, to sub-tropical. As a result, a variety of crops, livestock and fish are to be found.This industry spans the processing of freshwater aquaculture and mariculture, exotic and indigenous meats, nuts, herbs and fruit. It also involves the production and export of deciduous fruit; production of wines for the local and export market; confectionary manufacturing and export; and the processing of natural fibres from cotton, hemp, sisal, kenaf and pineapple.World-class infrastructure, counter-seasonality to Europe, vast biodiversity and marine resources, and competitive input costs make the country a major player on the world’s markets.In 2013, Trade and Industry minister Rob Davies said the agro-processing sector is worth R49-billion and has created as many as 207 893 jobs in the third quarter of that year. It is also significant in sustaining the environment and growing the economy. He added that since 2008, food processing grew by over 2% more than the manufacturing sector as a whole.The government’s New Growth Path (NGP) and National Development Plan (NDP) both identified agro-processing as a sector with high growth potential, despite the challenges of imports competition, loss of market and the unstable currency and exchange rate. AutomotiveThe automotive industry is one of South Africa’s most important sectors, with many of the major multinationals using South Africa to source components and assemble vehicles for both the local and international markets.South Africa’s automotive industry is a global, turbo-charged engine for the manufacture and export of vehicles and components. The sector accounts for about 12% of South Africa’s manufacturing exports, making it a crucial cog in the economy.The automotive and components industry is perfectly placed for investment opportunities. Vehicle manufacturers such as BMW, Ford, Volkswagen, Daimler-Chrysler and Toyota have production plants in the country, while component manufacturers (Arvin Exhaust, Bloxwitch, Corning, Senior Flexonics) have established production bases here.The industry is largely located in two provinces, the Eastern Cape (coastal) and Gauteng (inland). Companies with production plants in South Africa are placed to take advantage of the low production costs, coupled with access to new markets as a result of trade agreements with the European Union and the Southern African Development Community free trade area. Opportunities also lie in the production of materials (automotive steel and components).In 2013, the DTI introduced the Automotive Production Development Programme (APDP) with the intention of increasing the volume of cars manufactured in South Africa to 1.2-million annually by 2020 as well as to diversify the automotive components chain. The APDP is a migration from the Motor Industry Development Programme, which has affected second and third tier suppliers, and original equipment manufacturers.The National Association of Automobile Manufacturers (NAAM) said production, particularly those of light motor vehicles, will rise from 2014 onward because of the APDP.According to NAAM, average industry employment figures rose by 441 jobs in the third quarter of 2013, therefore bringing the total to 30 344 positions within the industry. New car sales also rose to 125 189 units, more than 6.4% more than in the corresponding quarter in 2012.The local industry’s largest export market remains Europe, despite the effects the recession is having on the Euro zone. In 2012, 66 929 vehicles were sold to Europe, 6 000 more than is sold in Africa. However, the recession resulted in a 12.7% drop to 58 403 vehicles. ChemicalsThe chemicals industry has been shaped by the political and regulatory environment that created a philosophy of isolationism and protectionism during the apartheid years. This tended to foster an inward approach and a focus on import replacement in the local market. It also encouraged the building of small-scale plants with capacities geared to local demand, which tended to be uneconomic.Through isolation of the industry from international competition and high raw material prices as a result of import tariffs, locally processed goods have generally been less than competitive in export markets. Now that South Africa is once more fully part of the global community, South African chemical companies are focusing on the need to be internationally competitive and the industry is reshaping itself accordingly.The South African chemicals sector has two noticeable characteristics. Firstly, while its upstream sector is concentrated and well developed, the downstream sector – although diverse – remains underdeveloped. Secondly, the synthetic coal and natural gas-based liquid fuels and petrochemicals industry is prominent, with South Africa being the world leader in coal-based synthesis and gas-to-liquids technologies.The industry is the largest of its kind in Africa. It is highly complex and widely diversified, with end products often being composed of a number of chemicals that have been combined in some way.The primary and secondary sectors are dominated by Sasol (through Sasol Chemical Industries and Sasol Polymers), AECI and Dow Sentrachem. These companies have recently diversified and expanded their interests in tertiary products, especially those with export potential.In 2013, the sector was South Africa’s fourth-largest employer with 200 000 jobs and contributed about 5% to the country’s GDP.The Global Business Report says Africa is quickly becoming a significant chemical consumer and that if South Africa increases trade with its neighbours, the industry could be ignited. Information and communications technologyThe South African information and communication technologies (ICT) sector is the largest and most advanced in Africa, and is characterised by technology leadership, particularly in the field of mobile software and electronic banking services.With a network that is 99.9% digital and includes the latest in wireless and satellite communication, the country has the most developed telecoms network in Africa.South African companies are global leaders in pre-payment, revenue management and fraud prevention systems, and in the manufacture of set-top boxes, all of which are exported successfully to the rest of the world.Export growth and internationalisation of South African companies is supported by the Department of Trade and Industry via South African Electrotechnical Export Council (SAEEC).According to the SAECC, the South African ICT market is estimated at US$ 42.6-billion (R468.4-billion) in 2013 with IT accounting for US$ 15.08-billion (R164-billion) and communications US$ 27.18-billion (R297.4-billion). The sector contributes approximately 8.2% to South Africa’s GDP.Several international corporates, recognised as leaders in the IT sector, operate subsidiaries from South Africa, including IBM, Unisys, Microsoft, Intel, Systems Application Protocol (SAP), Dell, Novell and Compaq.Testing and piloting systems and applications are growing businesses in South Africa, with the diversity of the local market, first world know-how in business and a developing country environment making it an ideal test lab for new innovations.Export growth and internationalisation of South African companies is supported by the Department of Trade and Industry via the Electrotechnical Export Council (SAEEC).The electronics industry has repeatedly demonstrated world-class innovation and production. The industry is characterised by a handful of generalist companies with strong capabilities in professional electronics, while small to medium companies specialise in security systems and electricity pre-payment meters.Investment opportunities lie in the development of access control systems and security equipment, automotive electronic subsystems, systems and software development in the banking and financial services sector, silicon processing for fibre optics, integrated circuits and solar cells. There are also significant opportunities for the export of hardware and associated services, as well as software and peripherals. MetalsSouth Africa’s large, well-developed metals industry, with vast natural resources and a supportive infrastructure, represents roughly a third of all South Africa’s manufacturing.It comprises basic iron ore and steel, basic non-ferrous metals and metal products. The basic industries involve the manufacture of primary iron and steel products from smelting to semi-finished stages.Primary steel products and semi-finished products include billets, blooms, slabs, forgings, reinforcing bars, railway track material, wire rod, seamless tubes and plates.The primary steel industry is a significant contributor to the economy and earns considerable amounts of valuable foreign exchange.ArcelorMittal SA, formerly Iscor and now part of global steel company ArcelorMittal, is South Africa’s largest steel producer. Other industry players are Scaw Metals, Cape Gate, Columbus Stainless Steel, Highveld Steel and Vanadium and Cisco.South Africa ranks 21st among the crude-steel producing countries in the world – producing in the region of 1% of the world’s crude steel. South Africa is also the largest steel producer in Africa: it is responsible for more than half of the total crude steel production of the continent. South Africa’s steel production bucked the global trend in 2013, increasing by 4.1%, from 6.9-millioon tonnes a year to 7.2-million tonnes. Of that amount, the South African Iron and Steel Institute stated that 1.74-million tonnes of primary steel products were exported.The international and local steel industry has changed dramatically over the past two years. Several steel companies have fallen away and protectionism has increased.To survive in these harsh conditions, the South African primary steel industry has taken major steps to become more efficient and competitive. Many local steelworks have engaged in restructuring and productivity improvements.South Africa’s non-ferrous metal industries comprise aluminium and other metals (including copper, brass, lead, zinc and tin). Aluminium is the largest sector but, as South Africa has no commercially exploitable deposits, feedstock is imported. South Africa is ranked eighth in world production of aluminium. Key players include Billiton (with smelters in Richards Bay) and Hulett Aluminium.Other non-ferrous metals have a lesser role, but are still important for exports and foreign exchange earnings. Although the country’s copper, brass and bronze industries have declined, it is hoped that new mining and reclamation technologies will allow the exploitation of previously unviable deposits. Textiles, clothing and footwearThe South African textile and clothing industry aims to use all the natural, human and technological resources at its disposal to make it the preferred international supplier. Though the textile and apparel industry is small, it is well placed to make this vision a reality.In 2013, textiles and clothing accounted for about 14% of manufacturing employment and represented South Africa’s second largest source of tax revenue. The textile industry is the most cost-effective way of creating jobs.Owing to technological developments, local textile production has evolved into a capital-intensive industry, producing synthetic fibres in ever-increasing proportions. The apparel industry has also undergone significant technological change and has benefited from the country’s sophisticated transport and communications infrastructure.The South African market demand increasingly reflects the sophistication of First World markets and the local clothing and textile industry has grown accordingly to offer the full range of services – from natural and synthetic fibre production to non-wovens, spinning, weaving, tufting, knitting, dyeing and finishing.With the US African Growth and Opportunity Act (Agoa) set to be renewed in 2015, the textile industry is set to benefit even more than before. When US Congress first approved Agoa in 2000, textile manufacturers were expected to benefit the most. Though it is not the case 14 years on – the motor industry is the greatest beneficiary – textile exports to the US increased by 62%.In spite of this, the industry remains vulnerable to cheap imports. China’s inclusion in the World Trade Organisation in 2001 rocked local manufacturers as South African businesses began importing cheaper textiles and clothing from the Asian country. Additionally, a relatively strong rand from 2003 onwards led to the industry’s decline.As a result, the number of jobs decreased. According to Enrique Crouse, chief executive of Prilla 2000, a textile mill in Pietermaritzburg, 181 000 people were employed in the local textile industry in 2002. In 2013 there were only 80 000. However, he said the government’s rescue plan for the textile and clothing industry, which was outlined in 2009, has done exceptionally well to recover the industry in recent years and is in the best position it has been in a last decade.Despite this setback, Paul Geldenhuys, general manager of Mozimax, a textile company in Tongaat, is certain the local industry is on the mend. He said that though many economists say the weaker rand negatively affects the economy, it can also make imports more expensive, which would inevitably force suppliers to buy from local manufacturers.MiningThe massive Sishen open-cast iron-ore mine in the Northern Cape. (Image: Brand South Africa)The country is renowned for an abundance of mineral resources, accounting for a significant proportion of both world production and reserves, and South African mining companies dominate many sectors in the global industry. Mining and quarrying contributed 4.9% to GDP in 2013.South Africa is the world’s biggest producer of gold and platinum and one of the leading producers of base metals and coal.The country’s diamond industry is the fourth-largest in the world, with only Botswana, Canada and Russia producing more diamonds each year.Although well over a century old, South Africa’s mining industry is far from fully tapped. The country is a treasure trove, with mineral deposits only matched by some countries of the former Soviet Union.South Africa – while holding the world’s largest reserves of gold, platinum-group metals and manganese ore – has considerable potential for the discovery of other world-class deposits in areas yet to be exhaustively explored.The country produces 10% of the world’s gold, and has 40% of the world’s known resources. It is estimated that 36 000 tons of undeveloped resources – about one third of the world’s unmined gold – still remains.The sector spans the full spectrum of the five major mineral categories – namely precious metals and minerals, energy minerals, non-ferrous metals and minerals, ferrous minerals and industrial minerals.Apart from its prolific mineral reserves, South Africa’s strengths include a high level of technical and production expertise, and comprehensive research and development activities.The country has world-scale primary processing facilities covering carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminium – in addition to gold and platinum.With the growth of South Africa’s secondary and tertiary industries, as well as a decline in gold production, mining’s contribution to South Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP) has declined over the past few decades. However, this may be offset by an increase in the downstream or beneficiated minerals industry, which the government has targeted as a growth sector.Lucrative opportunities exist for downstream processing and adding value locally to iron, carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminium, platinum group metals and gold.A wide range of materials is available for jewellery – including gold, platinum, diamonds, tiger’s eye and a variety of other semi-precious stones.The Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act of 2002 opened the doors to meaningful participation of black people in the exploration and exploitation of mineral resources. The Act enshrines equal access to mineral resources, irrespective of race, gender or creed.South Africa’s mining industry is continually expanding and adapting to changing local and international world conditions, and remains a cornerstone of the economy, making a significant contribution to economic activity, job creation and foreign exchange earnings.AgricultureA maize field under centre-pivot irrigation near Hoedspruit, Mpumalanga. (Image: Brand South Africa)Agriculture as a percentage of GDP has decreased over past four decades. This implies that the economy has gradually become more advanced. In 1960, agriculture constituted 9,1% of the total economy; this has decreased to only 2,2% in 2013. Though this decrease would seem to be a negative trend from a farmer’s perspective, it signals that the South African economy is reaching maturity as the secondary and tertiary sectors become more important.Maize is most widely grown – followed by wheat, oats, sugar cane and sunflowers. The government has been developing programmes to promote small-scale farming and to boost job creation. Citrus and deciduous fruits are exported, as are locally produced wines and flowers.South Africa has both well-developed commercial farming and more subsistence-based production in the deep rural areas.Covering 1.2-million square kilometres of land, South Africa is one-eighth the size of the United States and has seven climatic regions, from Mediterranean to subtropical to semi-desert.This biodiversity, together with a coastline 3 000 kilometres long and served by seven commercial ports, favours the cultivation of a wide range of marine and agricultural products – from deciduous, citrus and subtropical fruit, to grain, wool, cut flowers, livestock and game.Agricultural activities range from intensive crop production and mixed farming in winter rainfall and high summer rainfall areas, to cattle ranching in the bushveld and sheep farming in the arid regions.While 13% of South Africa’s land can be used for crop production, only 22% of this is high-potential arable land. The greatest limitation is the availability of water. Rainfall is distributed unevenly across the country, with some areas prone to drought. Almost 50% of water is used for agriculture, with about 1.3-million hectares under irrigation.South Africa is not only self-sufficient in virtually all major agricultural products, but is also a net food exporter. Farming remains vitally important to the economy and the development of the southern African region.CommunicationsTelkom’s microwave communications tower on Naval Hill in Bloemfontein, Free State. (Image: Brand South Africa)The communications sector has been one of the fastest growing of the South African economy, reflecting the rapid expansion of mobile telephony across the country.Telkom, a listed company in which the government is the biggest shareholder, was until recently the only licensed provider of public fixed-line telecommunications services. Telkom is also a key player in an optical fibre undersea cable project that will cater for Africa’s growing telecommunications needs for the next 25 years.In late 2006, the government awarded Neotel a licence to become the second fixed-line operator. A court ruling in 2009 had added impetus, allowing value added network service providers – of which there are about 300 in South Africa – to build their own networks. There is also a second transatlantic cable, Seacom.South Africa’s cellular phone market has grown phenomenally since its inception in 1994. It is also the fourth fastest growing Groupe Speciale Mobile (GSM) market in the world.Cellular services are provided by three licensed operators: Vodacom, MTN and Cell C.The country has more than 33 million mobile phones. The introduction of number portability in November 2006 has increased the flexibility of the mobile service industry and is expected to bolster competition between various providers.South Africa is also the largest Internet market in South Africa, with an estimated 4.6- to 5.4-million users. There are still around 700 000 dial-up users, while there were 1.35-million broadband connections at the end of 2008. Research firm World Wide Worx predicts that South Africa will show steady Internet user growth over the next few years, reaching 8.5-million Internet users in 2013 and 9-million users in 2014.According to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Information Industry Competitiveness Index 2008, South Africa ranks 37th out of 66 countries reviewed, owing to well-established business and legal sectors.TourismCamps Bay in Cape Town, the South African city most favoured by international travellers. (Image: Brand South Africa)Tourism is regarded as a modern-day engine of growth and is one of the largest industries globally. One of the advantages of tourism as an export earner is that it is less volatile than the commodity sector.Tourism has been earmarked as a growth industry in South Africa, as the industry is ideally suited to adding value to the country’s many natural, cultural and other resources.According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, tourism directly and indirectly constitutes approximately 7% of GDP and employment in South Africa.Wholesale and retail tradeMaponya Mall in Soweto is just one of the many shopping malls springing up in townships across South Africa. (Image: Brand South Africa)Statistics South Africa produces a monthly survey of the retail trade industry, covering various retail trade enterprises.The survey generally covers retailers in specialised food, beverages, tobacco, pharmaceutical and medical goods, cosmetics and toiletries, general dealers, textiles, clothing, footwear, leather goods, household furniture, appliances and equipment, hardware, paint and glass, as well as various other dealers in miscellaneous goods.Among the major retailing groups are Edcon, Massmart, Pick n Pay, Shoprite Checkers, Mr Price Group, Foschini Group, JD Group and Ellerines Holdings.Finance and business servicesA banking contact centre in Auckland Park, Johannesburg. (Image: Brand South Africa)South Africa, despite its “emerging market” status, has a sophisticated financial sector. With the country’s reintegration into the global sphere in 1994, corporate governance rules, disclosure, transparency and accountability have become an integral part of doing business in South Africa.Consequently, regulations governing the financial sector, and particularly risk management, have undergone considerable refinement to align them to internationally recognised standards and best practice.The financial, real estate and business service sector, together with other services sectors, has proved to be a pillar of the country’s economic growth over the years.The sector boasts dozens of domestic and foreign institutions providing a full range of services – commercial, retail and merchant banking, mortgage lending, insurance and investment.South Africa’s banking sector compares favourably with those of industrialised countries. Foreign banks are well represented and electronic banking facilities are extensive, with a nationwide network of automatic teller machines (ATMs). Internet banking is also available.The Financial Services Board oversees the regulation of financial markets and institutions – including insurers, fund managers and broking operations, but excluding banks, which fall under the South African Reserve Bank.The South African banking system is well developed and effectively regulated, comprising a central bank, a few large, financially strong banks and investment institutions, and a number of smaller banks.Many foreign banks and investment institutions have set up operations in South Africa over the past decade. The Banks Act is based on similar legislation in the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada.Although no formal agreements have established a consistent international position in the area of banking regulation, there have been amendments to exchange controls as well as financial market legislation, making South Africa an attractive investment prospect.The National Payment System Act of 1998 was introduced to bring the South African financial settlement system in line with international practice. The Act confers greater powers and duties on the SA Reserve Bank in respect of providing clearing and settlement facilities.The Payment Association of South Africa, under the supervision of the Reserve Bank, has facilitated the introduction of payment clearing house agreements. It has also introduced agreements pertaining to settlement, clearing and netting agreements, and rules to create certainty and reduce systemic and other risks in inter-bank settlement. These developments have brought South Africa in line with international inter-bank settlement practice.Investment and merchant banking remains the most competitive front in the industry, while the country’s “big four” banks – Absa, Standard Bank, Nedbank and FNB – continue to consolidate their grip on the retail market.Reserve Bank An office headed by the Registrar of Banks, operating as part of the Reserve Bank, is responsible for registering institutions as banks or mutual banks, and for enforcing the legislation.The registrar acts with relative autonomy in executing his duties, but has to report annually on his activities to the Minister of Finance, who in turn has to table this report in Parliament. The extent of supervision entails the establishment of certain capital and liquidity requirements and the continuous monitoring of institutions’ adherence to legal requirements and other guidelines.The performance of an individual institution is also monitored against developments in the relevant sector as a whole. If deemed necessary, inspectors can be appointed to inspect the affairs of any bank, or any institution or person not registered as a bank if there is reason to suspect that such an institution or person is carrying on the business of banking.Financial Services Board The Financial Services Board is an independent institution established by statute to oversee South Africa’s non-banking financial services industry.The board’s mission is to promote sound and efficient financial institutions and services, together with mechanisms for investor protection.Major financial institutions regulated by the board include the country’s exchanges and insurers, both short term-and long-term.Investment incentivesSouth Africa offers various attractive investment incentives, targeted at specific sectors or types of business activities. These are:The Enterprise Investment Programme manufacturing programmeThe EIP (manufacturing) is a cash grant for locally based manufacturers who wish to establish a new production facility, expand an existing facility, or upgrade an existing facility in manufacturing industries.The Enterprise Investment Programme tourism support programmeThe EIP (tourism) is an investment incentive grant, payable over a period of two to three years, to support the development of tourism enterprises, and in so doing, stimulate job creation and encourage the geographical spread of tourism investment throughout South Africa.Tourism-related activities supported by the grant include the following:Accommodation servicesPassenger transport servicesTour operatorsCultural servicesRecreational and entertainment servicesForeign investment grantThis grant seeks to compensate qualifying foreign investors for the cost of moving qualifying new machinery and equipment from abroad to South Africa.Critical infrastructureThe critical infrastructure fund is a cash grant for projects designed to improve critical infrastructure in South Africa, including the following:Transport systems – road and rail systemsElectricity transmission and distribution systems – power flow and regulation systemsTelecommunications networks – cabling and signal transmission systemsSewage systems – network and purificationWaste storage, disposal and treatment systemsFuel supply systems – piping for liquid, gas, and solid fuel conveyer transportationIndustrial development zonesIDZs are purpose-built industrial estates linked to international ports that leverage fixed direct investments in value-added and export-oriented manufacturing industries.These zones provide the following benefits:Quality infrastructureExpedited customs proceduresDuty-free operating environmentsThe location film and television production incentiveThis incentive programme consists of a Large Budget Film and Television Production Rebate Scheme, whereby foreign-owned qualifying producers are rebated a maximum of R10-million for the production of large budget films and television productions.The South African Film and Television Production and Co-Production Incentive Financial assistance to South African feature films, tele-movies, television drama series, documentaries andanimation. The objective is to contribute to the local film industry. Production budgets are required to be more than R10-million, with the rebate being 35%, capped at R10-million.Export marketing and investment assistanceThe EMIA scheme partially compensates exporters in respect of activities aimed at developing export markets for South African products and services, and to recruit new FDI into South Africa.The scheme provides assistance in the form of:Air travel expensesSubsistence allowancesFreight-forwarding of display materialsExhibition space and booth rental costs.The business process outsourcing and offshoring investment incentiveThe BPO&O investment incentive comprises an investment grant, and a training support grant, towards costs of company-specific training.The incentive is offered to local and foreign investors establishing projects that aim primarily to serve offshore clients.Automotive production and development programmeThis programme has four key elements:Tariff reduction freeze from 2013 until 2020Local assembly allowanceProduction incentivesAutomotive investment allowanceUseful links Department of Trade and Industry Southern African Development Community Reserve Bank National Treasury Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? 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Weed answers for 2016?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We heard recently that there is as yet no approval or plans to sell the new soybean herbicide technologies for 2016. Some of you have been waiting for this miracle of science to bail you out of your weed resistance problems. Sale of dicamba or 2,4-D resistant soybeans will probably not happen until 2017 on a large scale. What we do have is the possibility of better management from you — the person who sets the weed control program on your farm. Many of your neighbors have found the solution to managing resistant weeds. You need to ask them for tips, all of which likely came originally from OSU’s Mark Loux.Marestail has two primary periods of emergence — from late summer into fall, and from late March through June. But we learned this year that marestail can germinate almost any time. We tend to think that spring-emerging marestail was the most problematic to manage. In years when I have seen a dry August, we tend not to have a lot of late summer and fall emergence which means we will probably have a shift to more spring emergers, or it will rain throughout October and flush all the seeds into the system as fall emerging marestail.Here’s the fall management suggestion:Start with a fall herbicide application — this is an integral part of marestail management. The primary role of the fall treatment is to remove the marestail plants that emerge in late summer and fall, so that the spring herbicide treatments do not have to control plants that have overwintered.An effective fall treatment results in a weed free seedbed in early spring, and more flexibility for the spring burndown/residual treatment timing. Marestail plants are small in the fall, and easily controlled with 2,4-D.No one I have talked with was ever sorry they spent money on fall applications.In the spring you’ll need to apply another burndown and make the application of an effective pre-emergent herbicide.Giant ragweed populations with resistance to glyphosate can occur in Ohio and appear to be increasing. Some populations have resistance or a high tolerance to both glyphosate and ALS inhibitor herbicides. Postemergence control of these populations in soybeans can be extremely difficult, and the most effective management strategy may be to plant corn. It is essential that no-till soybean fields with resistant populations receive a preplant treatment of 2,4-D ester, to ensure that that the field is weed free at the time of planting. This would be following your fall burndown application if you have marestail and the one when you apply residual herbicides.Include residual herbicides in the preplant burndown treatment (or apply these after planting where tillage is used), which involves the use of Scepter or a product containing chlorimuron or cloransulam.These herbicides will reduce the giant ragweed population and slow the growth of remaining plants to build more flexibility in the postemergence application window. None of these herbicides will control ALS-resistant giant ragweed, however.Use of Liberty in Liberty Link soybeans is still the most effective tool for management of glyphosate-resistant giant ragweed populations. OSU and Purdue research has shown that glyphosate- and ALS-resistant populations can also be managed with multiple applications of PPO inhibitors (such as Flexstar, Cobra), although this approach may lead to the development of resistance to these herbicides as well.And yes, new technology is coming, sometime, but it will still require good management and the application of a pre-emergent herbicide. Learn now and continue to implement those skills.Other updates are posted on the Weeds webpage: http://agcrops.osu.edu/specialists/weeds, particularly view the Site of Action videos under multi-media. The weed science weed team also has a blog where they post some good videos: http://u.osu.edu/osuweeds/.last_img read more

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When “What If?” Lasts Until November

first_imgTime to dance.The Big 12’s November mini-playoff has been well-documented over the last week. TCU, Baylor, OU and the Pokes for the 2015 Big 12 title. It should be electric. It might be the best end-of-season race in conference history.College football is of course almost never not exciting. Look at last year. OSU was an abomination at this point in the season. You could argue that it ended in the most exciting way an OSU season has ever ended. That’s the beauty of rivalries and conference title spoilers. That’s the beauty of college football’s regular season.What isn’t always present, however, is the lingering “what if … ” questions. Those are usually quelled by mid-October or, sometimes, the end of September. All 128 teams start out the end of August saying “what if … ?” Very few get to play the game in November.At the beginning of every season, my friends and I always play a high-spirited contest of “what if … ?” We try our darndest to top one another. This usually evolves from “what if OSU blows out to Central Michigan?” to “what if OSU is down six to OU on Thanksgiving weekend with an 11-0 season on the line and Mason Rudolph has the ball on his own 10 with 90 seconds left?” There are a lot of scenarios between those two.It’s a fun game but it’s almost never more fun than it is at the beginning of the regular season. Teams are error-free. Nobody has lost. It’s light-hearted and tremendous. It’s why we like new beginnings.This year is different. This year, Mike Gundy’s squad has quietly and solidly been improving every single week. It’s something Gundy has talked about all year. “Play your best football at the end of the season.” OSU is doing so right now.Which means the “what ifs” have continued yet another week as October bleeds into college football’s very best month.What ifs like, “what if Trevone Boykin loses for the third time in Boone Pickens Stadium in his career?” and “what if Art Briles remains winless in Stillwater?” and “what if OU loses to Baylor and Oklahoma State wins its next three games and has the Big 12 title sewn up before Bedlam?” and finally, “what if Bedlam is to get the No. 1 seed in the College Football Playoff?”This is what you dream of as a college football fan. This is as good as the sport gets. Games are exciting for different reasons (again, see Bedlam 2014) but the “what if” games are the very best games.But these aren’t even the biggest “what if” questions of this month. A month when the weather turns bitter but the football remains sweet. A month when the Cowboy faithful fill Boone’s house to the brim and try to will their undermatched team to its second conference crown in the last five years.A month when Mason Rudolph and J.W. Walsh have a chance to become this year’s Cardale Jones and J.T. Barrett (minus the “I word”). A month when you can rank Big 12 teams as low as you want in the College Football Playoff rankings, but you can’t ignore 12-0.No, the biggest question of November has suddenly become what if “what if” lasts until December?If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Sources: LAFC signing Canadian winger Kaye

first_imgTransfers Sources: LAFC set to sign Canadian winger Mark-Anthony Kaye Ives Galarcep @soccerbyives 01:28 1/31/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Mark Anthony Kaye Canada Gold Cup Thomas Shea/USA Today Transfers Los Angeles MLS Los Angeles FC is on the verge of boosting its wing options with the acquisition of the Canadian national team midfielder Los Angeles FC is set to sign Canadian national team midfielder Mark-Anthony Kaye, sources confirmed to Goal on Tuesday.LAFC acquired Kaye’s rights after completing a transfer deal with Kaye’s former club, Louisville City, for an undisclosed fee believed to be one of the highest paid for a USL player. The 23-year-old left-footed winger played for Canada in last summer’s CONCACAF Gold Cup.A former member of Toronto FC’s academy and player on TFC 2’s inaugural squad, Kaye impressed in USL in 2017 as a member of Louisville City’s championship-winning squad. He scored four goals during the 2017 USL campaign and added another in the U.S. Open Cup.  Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Kaye joins an LAFC attack that already boasts Mexican star Carlos Vela and former Sporting KC speedster Latif Blessing among its wing midfield options.Kaye has shown some versatility in his young career as well, playing in a central midfield role for Canada at the Gold Cup, while also counting left back as a position he could fill if needed.last_img read more

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