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Dressed to Kill! Get a Glittery First Look at Michael C. Hall in Hedwig

first_img Related Shows Michael C. Hall is ready to put on some makeup, turn up the eight track and pull the wig down from the shelf! The Broadway alum and Dexter favorite will headline Hedwig and the Angry Inch beginning October 16 at the Belasco Theatre, succeeding Andrew Rannells and Neil Patrick Harris in the role of the East German rock goddess. Directed by Michael Mayer, the Tony-winning revival of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s 1998 musical tells the story of Hedwig, who regales the audience with her tales of escaping communist East Berlin, her botched sex-change operation and her failed relationship with rock icon Tommy Gnosis. Check out Hall’s glittering new look, then see him rock out beginning October 16! Hedwig and the Angry Inch View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015last_img read more

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Last Brazilian World War II Veteran Pilot Dies

first_img After his return to Brazil, he remained in the 1st Fighter Aviation Regiment, on the Santa Cruz Air Force Base. Later, he studied aeronautical engineering and served as Director of Engineering at the Material Directorate and the Routes Directorate. While living in Canada, he was part of the International Civil Aviation Organization, in the city of Montreal. By Dialogo September 18, 2013 The Brazilian Air Force (FAB) and the Brazilian Expeditionary Force (FEB) registered in Brazil’s military history pages of glory and heroism that make us proud and are valued by the allied countries in the Second World War conflict. Brig. MIRANDA CORRÊA will be remembered as an example of courage, professional virtue, an aeronautical vocation motivator, and love to the Homeland that watch his birth. By the way, Brazil was the only country which offered soldiers to the Great War without being intimidated or invited. It only requested, in retribution, a piece of land in Pistoia, Italy, to bury his dead. Today, the Pistoia cemetery is symbolic and the remains of our soldiers rest at the FEB Monument at Rio de Janeiro city.Ney de Araripe Sucupira – Honorary Member of the Brazilian Air Force – São Paulo Lieutenant General José Carlos de Miranda Corrêa died on September 15, in Rio de Janeiro. He died at 1:13 p.m. at the age of 93, in the Hospital Central da Aeronáutica (HCA), where he was hospitalized. Lieutenant General Miranda Corrêa was a Combat Pilot and Information Officer in the World War II 1st Fighter Aviation Regiment, in Italy. Between November 13, 1944 and January 3, 1945, he participated in eight war missions. Currently, he was the last surviving Brazilian veteran of World War II. Before he fought in Italy, then Lieutenant Miranda Corrêa performed his training as a Combat Pilot in the United States and Panama. Some of the awards he was honored with throughout his career include the Aviation Cross – A Ribbon, the Italy Campaign, the Atlantic South Campaign, the Order of Air Merit, the Santos Dumont Order of Merit, a Distinguished Flying Cross (for sinking a German ship on the coast of Rio de Janeiro), a Presidential Unit Citation, and a Bronze Star, with the latter three having been awarded by the U.S. government. last_img read more

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Collaboration is the key for cybersecurity success

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Working with credit unions of all sizes for just under 12 years now in the realm of cybersecurity, it was evident that collaboration is the key to combat the adversaries around the world. My impression was backed up in the summer of 2014 when the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) piloted a cybersecurity examination work program (Cybersecurity Assessment) at over 500 community financial institutions to evaluate their preparedness to mitigate cyber risks. One of the key findings was that there is a serious need to enhance threat intelligence and collaboration.With credit unions trending to acquire community charters, competition plays more of a role than collaboration. Although competition can be healthy, it doesn’t prove to be a positive thing when fighting cybercrime. The FFIEC published the following four questions for credit unions to consider:What is your process to gather and analyze threat and vulnerability information from multiple sources?How do you leverage this information to improve risk management practices?What reports are provided to your board on cyber events and trends?Who is accountable for maintaining relationships with law enforcement? continue reading »last_img read more

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High-Level Fed Committee Overruled Carmen Segarra’s Finding on Goldman

first_imgA committee that includes senior Federal Reserve officials reviewed and overturned a bank examiner’s finding that Goldman Sachs lacked a firm-wide policy to prevent conflicts of interest, according to a top Fed official.Bill Dudley, the head of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, disclosed the action by the “Operating Committee” in a little-noticed aspect of his testimony last month before the U.S. Senate. Dudley said the panel was part of a new effort by the Fed to raise standards across the board by comparing  the practices and health of the nation’s banks against each other.In his testimony, Dudley provided the Fed’s most detailed account to date of how it reversed the conclusions of Carmen Segarra, a New York Fed bank examiner who asserted that Goldman lacked the Fed’s recommended firm-wide policy to prevent conflicts of interest. Dudley told the senators that the Operating Committee had “fully vetted” Segarra’s finding but said “there was this lack of willingness to agree.” He said that while he encourages examiners to speak up, their views must be “fact based.”New documents and secret recordings shed more light on the facts Segarra marshaled to support her position. The examiner, for example, compared Goldman’s approach to conflicts with that of Barclays and Morgan Stanley. She found that, unlike with Goldman, the policies of both banks were detailed, specific and clearly addressed to the entire firm.ProPublica also found that:Goldman executives acknowledged to Segarra that they had no single firm-wide policy on conflicts of interest, according to official meeting minutes she kept.Segarra formally presented her findings in a session with specialized Fed examiners stationed at nine of the too-big-to-fail banks. They agreed that Goldman did not have the sort of policy recommended in Fed guidelines, according to Segarra and another examiner who was present.In disputing her finding just before she was fired, the senior Fed official overseeing Goldman Sachs pointed to the code of conduct for employees displayed on Goldman’s website, saying it amounted to a firm-wide policy. Goldman’s code of conduct at the time did not contain characteristics that were found in the conflicts policies of other banks that experts consider best practices. The Goldman code addressed conflicts involving employees’ personal holdings but not those that could arise from the firm’s deals.Segarra was not called to testify at the Senate hearing. And in his appearance, Dudley did not detail specifically what evidence the Operating Committee considered in overruling Segarra, on what basis the decision was made, or whether it considered any of Segarra’s documentation or examination findings.“I think the position of the senior supervisors was that there was a conflict-of-interest policy, and that is what the debate was about,” Dudley said.As ProPublica and This American Life previously reported, Segarra secretly recorded 46 hours of internal meetings while at the Fed after encountering resistance to her examination into Goldman.At the hearing, David Beim, a Columbia University professor, testified that the recordings “illustrated in Technicolor” the problems he found in the 2009 study of the New York Fed’s culture that Dudley had commissioned. Among other things, the study said examiners were afraid to speak up and that findings were being watered down by higher-ups and an over-reliance on consensus.“It does suggest to me that not as much change has happened as I would have hoped and that indeed, there is a continuing cultural problem and culture is slow to change,” Beim told the senators.Partly in response to concerns about examiner independence raised by Segarra’s case, the Federal Reserve Board has launched two reviews into whether information from frontline examiners is being heard by top decision-makers at the New York Fed and other regional reserve banks.Asked about the issue, Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen voiced strong support of Dudley. But Yellen also said that when examiners are at odds about what’s taking place in a bank, “it is important that there be channels by which they can make sure that disagreements are fed up to the highest levels.”At the heart of the dispute over Segarra’s findings is one of the most vexing and prevalent problems on Wall Street: conflicts of interest. Among its peers, Goldman stands out for its frequent run-ins over the issue.This month, the bank was among 10 Wall Street firms that were fined a total of $43.5 million for allegedly using the promise of favorable research, which was supposed to be impartial, to win business for their investment-banking divisions. The firms paid small fines without admitting wrongdoing.During a hearing in November, senators accused Goldman of deliberately pushing up the price of aluminum and giving confidential information to traders in the metal, providing them an unfair advantage. Goldman denied the allegation; two other firms also were criticized at the hearing.In 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission hit Goldman with a record $550 million fine related to conflicts in structuring mortgage bonds. The next year, the firm faced a shareholder lawsuit over a deal involving its advisory role to energy company El Paso in its sale to Kinder Morgan. Goldman held a $4 billion stake in Kinder Morgan. A judge harshly chastised the bank for its handling of the conflict.Segarra started at the New York Fed on Oct. 31, 2011, as a senior examiner for legal and compliance issues. Her bosses instructed Segarra to examine Goldman’s conflicts-of-interest policy as of Nov. 1, 2011, after the bank’s issues with conflicts landed in media reports.Conflicts not only can result in fines or lawsuits; they also can threaten a bank’s reputation, potentially imperiling its safety and soundness. Official guidance from the Fed recommends that banks have a global policy—that is, one that applies firm-wide—to deal with conflicts of interest.Five experts interviewed by ProPublica said the best policies have common characteristics: They define what a conflict is; explain how everyone in the firm is covered; identify roles and responsibilities; offer examples; provide ways to escalate conflicts to senior management; and track compliance.“This is not hard,” Segarra said in an interview. Before joining the New York Fed, she had worked for years helping banks comply with rules and regulations. “Most big firms have this.”The national business ethics survey consistently ranks conflicts of interest as one of the top three types of misconduct observed by employees, according to Patricia Harned, CEO of the Ethics and Compliance Officer Association. “The conflicts-of-interest policy should apply from the board of directors to the first level employee,” said Harned. “You need to spell out what you have to avoid.”The basis for Segarra’s examination of Goldman was a Fed Supervision and Regulation Letter known as SR 08-8 that specifically called for firm-wide policies in key areas including conflicts. In 2009, a review by the Federal Reserve Board had found fault with the New York Fed’s efforts to ensure that banks followed the guidance.In the course of her examination, Segarra said she asked her peers at other big banks to provide her with the conflicts-of-interest policies for the firms they covered. Her goal was to do the kind of comparisons Dudley praised in his recent Senate testimony.The New York Fed typically teams up banks based on common characteristics. The idea is to identify best practices and expose shortcomings. If one bank is weaker than its twin in a specific area, the laggard can be encouraged to raise its game. For example, big retail banks JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup are compared. Foreign banks are also paired: Deutsche Bank with Barclays; Credit Suisse with UBS. Goldman, as a broker dealer, is paired with another large broker dealer, Morgan Stanley, according to former examiners.ProPublica obtained Morgan Stanley’s policy, dated April 2011. It contained most of the best practices identified by experts. It was firm-wide and posted on the company’s intranet for every employee to see. Called “Morgan Stanley Global Conflicts of Interest Policy,” it applied to all employees of Morgan Stanley, offered a definition, spelled out roles and responsibilities, described how potential conflicts should be escalated and provided for annual reviews. The policy featured 20 different examples of potential conflicts.Segarra said she knew that Goldman was capable of writing a similar global policy because she had seen one. The firm’s policy for vendors, for example, was called “Goldman Sachs Firmwide Vendor Management Program” and had many of the same features found in Morgan Stanley’s conflicts policy.When Goldman was asked for its conflict-of-interest policy, a bank executive said it did not have a single policy, according to official minutes taken by Segarra in a meeting between supervisors and bank executives. It took months and several requests, Segarra said, before Goldman responded to her request for “copies of conflicts of interest policies, procedures, and risk assessments applicable to all [six] GS divisions … as of November 1, 2011.”Goldman eventually provided hundreds of pages of documents. The bank said that as part of recommendations from the firm’s Business Standards Committee, it was updating its policies. Two of its six divisions had new conflict-of-interest policies as of December 2011. The Investment Management Division was “in the final stages of completion,” and a full policy was unavailable.Based on these and other documents, as well as meetings with the firm’s executives, Segarra concluded Goldman did not have a policy that was firm-wide and that covered all divisions, and certainly did not have one on Nov. 1, the operative date specified in her examination.A pivotal meeting on the matter took place on April 25, 2012.Segarra and other New York Fed officials, along with regulators from the Securities and Exchange Commission, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and New York State Banking Authority, gathered with top Goldman executives to discuss how the firm handled conflicts generally and particularly in the El Paso-Kinder Morgan deal.Segarra and an examiner with the New York banking authority had prepared 65 questions for the Goldman executives. At the last moment, Segarra said, the New York Fed’s senior supervising officer stationed at Goldman, Michael Silva, told her she couldn’t ask the questions about the El Paso deal and needed to confine herself to queries about how the firm handled conflicts generally.Silva’s lawyer said his client declined to comment for this story due to a wrongful termination lawsuit by Segarra, which names New York Fed, Silva and other supervisors as defendants. The case is on appeal after being dismissed earlier this year on technical grounds.Segarra secretly recorded the April 25 meeting, where she asked Gwen Libstag, who headed Goldman’s conflicts group, when the investment management division’s policy would be ready.“I don’t know,” she responded in the recording Segarra shared with ProPublica. A Goldman executive then promised to provide the information at a later date while Libstag told the officials that the investment management division was operating under an older policy.Documents provided to Segarra by Goldman listed only three businesses within the investment management division that were using these older procedures. Two significant parts of the division, Goldman Sachs Asset Management and parts of its bank’s private wealth management group, did not appear to have any conflict-of-interest policy. As the two-hour meeting continued, Goldman executives said they did not provide employees with a definition of conflicts of interest nor did they give them examples.  The Goldman executives said they didn’t want bankers thinking about what would constitute a conflict because there were too many different possibilities.Instead, bankers were expected to refer any deals that involved possible conflicts to Libstag’s group, called the Business Selection and Conflicts Resolution, which would then decide if a conflict existed and if so what to do about it, the recording shows.“We don’t want bankers or anybody else making their own decisions,” Libstag said at the meeting. “There are so many different variations and case-specific facts that our judgment is that it’s better to analyze them case by case and make sure senior people are focused on them.”The SEC representatives questioned Goldman executives about one controversial aspect of the El Paso-Kinder Morgan deal: Why hadn’t Goldman notified El Paso that its lead banker advising the energy firm, Steve Daniel, had a personal investment of approximately $340,000 in Kinder Morgan?Goldman executives said they did not have a system in place to check personal holdings of bankers for conflicts. They were evaluating what to do about it, the executives told the regulators.(This past September, Goldman announced a new plan to restrict investments by employees who act in an advisory capacity or receive confidential information. The bank declined to say whether this was a result of Daniel and the El Paso-Kinder Morgan deal. Daniel is no longer at Goldman.)Segarra was fired on May 23, 2012. She said she left without ever receiving updated Goldman policies.Goldman declined to respond to detailed questions about the April 25 meeting or its conflict-of-interest policy at the time. “SR-08-8 states that a compliance program should establish a “framework for identifying, assessing, controlling, measuring, monitoring, and reporting compliance risks across the organizations…” and that is exactly what Goldman has put in place, “a comprehensive framework for managing compliance risks and potential conflicts across the firm,” the firm said in a statement.As Segarra proceeded with her examination, she updated colleagues who were doing the same work at other big banks. They met weekly for progress reports back at New York Fed headquarters. The group consisted of specialized examiners who had training in legal and compliance issues. As part of the Dodd-Frank financial system reforms, the New York Fed for the first time was stationing these specialized examiners inside the largest banks, whose failure could damage the entire financial system.Dudley highlighted the new effort in his testimony. “We embedded the risk specialists in the examination teams so that they were more involved with the bank and understood the bank’s risk taking activity,” he said.Two months before Segarra was fired, the legal and compliance risk specialists met for an all-day session to present their findings to peers and their managers. Their conclusions would eventually be factored into internal ratings for their respective banks. Since everybody was knowledgeable about the subject matter, the floor was open to questions and give-and-take, according to Segarra and another examiner present at the time.Segarra presented her findings on Goldman’s general policies as well as her conclusion that the firm did not have a conflicts-of-interest policy.“Everyone heard her arguments and nobody ever said ‘I disagree with your finding,’” said a former examiner, who continues to work in finance and asked for anonymity to discuss confidential Fed deliberations. “There was no policy, and anybody who looked at it could tell that.”A week later, Segarra met with Silva who, she said, had earlier received copies of the Morgan Stanley and Barclays documents. Again, she presented her findings to Silva and his deputy. She said neither objected to her conclusion that Goldman lacked a firm-wide conflicts policy.In mid-May, Silva informed Segarra in an email that Goldman had a conflicts-of-interest policy—the company code of conduct posted on its website. “Repeated statements that you have made to me that GS [Goldman] does not have a COI [conflict-of-interest] policy AT ALL are debatable at best, or alternatively, plainly incorrect,” the email states.The code of conduct Silva cited provides no guidance on how employees should deal with possible conflicts involving firm activities. It does not mention Libstag’s Business Selection and Conflicts Resolution Group, which was supposed to play the key role in reviewing such issues. It does refer to the need to avoid personal conflicts of interest and includes one illustrative example. Goldman did not give the code of conduct to Segarra when she asked  for its policies and procedures on conflicts.By comparison, Segarra found that Morgan Stanley had a detailed, firm-wide conflicts policy with numerous examples. Its separate Code of Conduct from the same period included a section on conflicts that involved both “potential business conflicts” and “potential personal conflicts.”Key details about how the Fed handled the Goldman issue remain unclear. At some point—the Fed declines to say when—the Operating Committee rejected Segarra’s finding.  Segarra never appeared before the committee and it’s not known what, if any, of the evidence she collected was provided to its members.The Operating Committee that Dudley referred to in his Senate testimony is a 20-person subset of the Fed’s Large Institutions Supervisory and Coordinating Committee. The full committee includes supervisory staff from the regional Federal Reserve banks and the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, D.C. The New York Fed currently has five members on the operating committee.“This was a question about whether Goldman Sachs had a conflict-of-interest policy or not, and Mike Silva and other senior people on the supervision side at the Federal Reserve Bank in New York, and, in fact, up to the Operating Committee that consists of people well beyond the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, concluded that Goldman Sachs did, in fact, have a conflict-of-interest policy,” said Dudley, who prior to joining the Fed was a partner and managing director at Goldman.A spokesman for the New York Fed declined to respond to questions about whether the Operating Committee had reviewed Segarra’s evidence. Segarra said no one on the committee spoke with her.Now, in light of Segarra’s case and reports that New York Fed supervisors blocked examiners from access to information at JPMorgan Chase, the Federal Reserve Board has asked its inspector general to review the communication flow from examiners to senior managers.Contacted by ProPublica, a spokesman for the inspector general said the agency is still determining how to approach the review and did not have an expected timeframe for completion.Related stories: Read more of reporter Jake Bernstein’scoverage of the Federal Reserve.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Sheffield Wednesday: Phil Neville on the list of candidates to be next manager | Football News

first_imgPaul Cook, Manager of Wigan Athletic reacts following the Sky Bet Championship match between Barnsley and Wigan Athletic at Oakwell Stadium on July 11, 2020 in Barnsley, England. Football Stadiums around Europe remain empty due to the Coronavirus Pandemic as Government social distancing laws prohibit fans inside venues resulting in all fixtures being played behind closed doorsImage:Paul Cook is one of the favourites to take over at Hillsborough Sheffield Wednesday manager Garry Monk Image:Garry Monk was sacked after just three wins from their opening 11 games of the season 1:56 preview image In April, Neville announced he would not be renewing his contract with the FA when it expires in July next year and is known to be considering a move into club football. The Owls finished 16th last season and had just climbed off the bottom of the table last weekend after a points deduction for breaking EFL rules was halved from 12 points to six on appeal. If he were to become Wednesday’s next managerial recruit, Neville would be expected to forego his role as manager of Great Britain’s women at the Tokyo Olympics next year.Former Wigan boss Paul Cook is one of the bookies early favourites alongside Tony Pulis.- Advertisement – A run of four straight league defeats was ended with last week’s 1-0 win against Bournemouth but Saturday’s goalless draw with Millwall at Hillsborough left them 23rd in the table. England Women manager Phil Neville is on a list of potential candidates to replace Garry Monk at Sheffield Wednesday.Monk’s sacking was exclusively revealed by Sky Sports News on Monday night with the Championship club languishing in 23rd spot in the table.- Advertisement – Ex-Leicester and Watford manager Nigel Pearson, a former Wednesday defender, has also been linked with a return to Hillsborough. Highlights of the Sky Bet Championship match between Sheffield Wed and Millwall. However, Pearson has previously suggested he would not want to manage in the city where his family home is.The former Swansea and Leeds boss had been in charge of the Championship outfit for just over a year.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Malaysian developers launch new $650 million waterfront community on Gold Coast

first_imgThe Malaysian developers have timed the launch of their flagship Australian project to meet increased demand for land on the Gold Coast.“SDSC has timed the first release of land to coincide with a resurgence in the Gold Coast market, which has been exhibiting a strong and consistent performance for some time,” Mr Hymus said.“We’ve seen solid demand for land in the city’s northern corridor over the past couple of years, particularly in areas such as Coomera and Pimpama.“However, there has been nothing like Serenity Cove come to the market in a very long time, especially in such a central location. Developers have described the new masterplanned community as a haven for boaties.TWO OF Malaysia’s largest developers have launched a $650 million masterplanned community on the northern Gold Coast.Serenity Cove is being developed by SDSC, a joint-venture partnership between Sime Darby and Brunsfield International Group.SDSC, which has owned the Helensvale site for eight years, has timed the launch of its flagship Australian project to meet increased demand for land on the Gold Coast. Serenity Cove, which is being marketed by Colliers International, will include luxury homes, apartments, a marine hub, shops and a dining precinct. Colliers International national director of residential project marketing, Tony Hymus, said Gold Coast land – “particularly waterfront lots of this calibre” – was in short supply. Colliers International national director of residential project marketing, Tony Hymus, says the developers have already completed site works and buyers can begin building immediately. Picture: Richard Gosling.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North11 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago“Hope Island has finally come of age and the market is increasingly recognising the amenity of the area, including extensive waterways, luxury resorts and championship golf courses.“Proximity to Brisbane is also proving a bonus. We had one interstate buyer arrive at Brisbane Airport at 9.30am and was on-site at 10.15am.”Mr Hymus said all lots were complete and buyers would be able to start building immediately.Serenity Cove, which borders Oyster Cove and Hope Island Resort, is considered the final piece of the Hope Island masterplan.Designed as a haven for boaties, there will be full marine amenities and direct access to the Broadwater via Coombabah Creek. A newly completed $5 million lock offers direct ocean access from Lake Serenity.center_img The project will include a retail and dining precinct.The first residential release comprises a mix of 48 waterfront lots along Saltwater Creek and Lake Serenity, some with marina berths. Blocks range from 630sq m to 1517sq m with prices starting at $529,000.Project manager Mark Mehr said the launch had been supported by strong buyer interest for land and a rising scarcity of prime waterfront lots.“This is the last development of its kind at Hope Island, and we’re being inundated with inquires from people nationwide,” Mr Mehr said. “We are expecting a good response from buyers as we release the first stage of this waterfront community. It offers a range of designs to suit a variety of lifestyles.” More than a third of the Serenity Cove site, or about 27ha, is dedicated as a nature reserve while a further 10ha will become parkland and 19ha will be developed.“We will deliver a quality project through commitment, creativity, and a holistic approach to building that is significantly minimising our impact on the environment,” Mr Mehr said. Development is expected to start on the commercial village and town homes once the first stage nears completion.last_img read more

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British Steel unveils trustee board for new scheme

first_imgDuring a 30-year career in financial services, Claydon worked mostly for Goldman Sachs, latterly as managing director in its pensions advisory group. British Steel has brought in two experienced independent trustees as part of the six-strong board for the new British Steel Pension Scheme (BSPS2).Allan Johnston will chair the board. He has been chairman of the existing British Steel scheme since 2007, and first joined the board in 2004.The two independent trustees are Catherine Claydon and Keith Greenfield.Claydon is an independent member of the trustee boards for Unilever’s UK pension scheme and the Barclays UK Retirement Fund. She was previously deputy chair of the BT Pension Scheme. Catherine Claydoncenter_img Keith GreenfieldGreenfield is a former finance director at insurance company Royal Sun Alliance, and has been a trustee of one of the group’s pension schemes for more than 12 years, including 10 as chair.He also chairs the Willis Pension Scheme, connected to the brokerage company that is now part of Willis Towers Watson, and the Pilkington Superannuation Scheme, for employees of the UK glass manufacturer.Claydon’s appointment on the trustee board runs until the end of 2020, while Greenfield’s term expires at the end of June 2019.Jo Regan, Shaun Corten and Peter Rees make up the rest of the BSPS2 board. All three are trustees of the existing scheme. Corten and Rees will remain in place until new member-nominated trustees are elected in 2019.On Monday, the trustees announced that the vast majority of its 122,000 members had chosen to transfer to the new scheme.It marked the latest stage in a ground-breaking restructuring of the scheme, which began last year after sponsoring employer Tata Steel UK warned it could no longer afford pension contributions and threatened to close down its UK operations.Instead, the trustees negotiated a ‘regulated apportionment arrangement’ (RAA) with the company and the Pensions Regulator to allow a new scheme to be set up offering lower annual benefit increases.Approximately 80% of members voted to transfer to the new scheme rather than the Pension Protection Fund (PPF), as it is expected to grant more generous benefits than the lifeboat scheme.The PPF will take on the remainder of the membership: roughly 25,000 people, according to the trustees’ preliminary numbers.Tata Steel UK will continue to sponsor the new scheme if it is approved by the regulator. The split is scheduled for March.last_img read more

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Batesville Named One of Best Places to Retire

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — Retirement is an opportunity for meeting new people and experiencing new things, and according to a new study Batesville is among the best places to do it in Indiana.SmartAsset ranked the cities with the most recreational and social opportunities for retirees as part of their study on the Best Places to Retire.The index factors in the number of recreation centers and retirement centers available to seniors as well as what percentage of the city’s population they represent.MonticelloNorth ManchesterGas CityScottsburgLawrenceburgBlufftonRochesterBedfordBatesvilleHartford Citylast_img read more

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Barca set to offload players in desperate bid to raise €70m

first_img Loading… Promoted ContentCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?10 TV Characters Who Were Destined To Become IconicTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread ArtAwesome And Unusual Staircases From All Over The World7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year Both players are about to enter the final year of their Camp Nou contracts – as is former Liverpool striker Luis Suarez and midfielder Riqui Puig, who could also be set for the exit. But ESPN have reported that any players could be up for grabs – with the exception of star forward Messi, midfielder De Jong and goalkeeper Ter Stegen. Defender Umtiti and midfielder Arthur Melo could be sold, while Ansu Fati has been linked with Borussia Dortmund. Barca had hoped to sell misfit Philippe Coutinho, but do not expect to fetch more than €80m for the Brazilian midfielder so have decided to keep him on for another season. Barcelona players Samuel Umtiti, Antoine Griezmann and Ousmane Dembele may be wondering what the future holds Read Also: Inter Milan striker informs Serie A outfit he wants Barca switch Another problem Barca face is the challenge of persuading well-paid players to leave during a transfer window when salaries are likely to be falling across the game. The club are unlikely to try and sell Ousmane Dembele, knowing they could not recoup the €105m they paid to sign him from Dortmund in 2017. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Barcelona may have to start working on deals to sell key players this summer, as the club reportedly has to meet a €70million shortfall before June 30. And only Lionel Messi, Frenkie de Jong and Marc-Andre ter Stegen are safe from the chop, according to one report. It is not yet known when the summer transfer window will open, with domestic leagues across Europe still to resume after the disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Manchester United and Arsenal have been credited with interest in Barcelona defender Samuel Umtiti – one of several players who could be sold in order to plug the shortfall. Spanish publication Marca has reported that at the beginning of this season, Barca had set a budget meaning they would have to sell players for a total of €120m by the end of June. Spain’s La Liga is not expected to restart before the middle of June, so the Catalan club may have to be busy behind the scenes trying to organise summer sales of their players if they’re to meet the deadline. Marca reports that they are currently €70m short of that target, and they are believed to be ready to listen to offers for midfielders Ivan Rakitic and Arturo Vidal.last_img read more

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Act of indiscipline: Messi Seen Ignoring Coach’s Instructions

first_img Sarabia continues to look at Messi as the six-time Ballon d’Or winner walks away. The video also shows what happened shortly beforehand. Messi turns away from a group chat, featuring Sarabia, mouthing some words while looking a little disgruntled The footage doesn’t look great and has led to speculation in the Spanish press – including AS and Mundo Deportivo – that tension exists between Messi and Barcelona’s coaching staff. read also:Here’s Liverpool star hilarious response picking between Messi, Ronaldo After the match, reports in Spain suggested that a few Blaugrana players took their frustrations out on the managerial team, taking aim at Quique Setien and his assistant Eder Sarabia for decisions they made throughout the match. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Complete Ignoring – Messi dismissed Sarabia’s advice pic.twitter.com/f4SdsPrZMA— Giorgi Javoiani (@javoiani) June 30, 2020 But some curious footage has emerged – courtesy of Movistar El Partidazo – which shows the club captain allegedly ignoring Barcelona’s assistant coach. In the clip, taken from the drinks break, we see the masked Sarabia looking and speaking at Messi, who appears to take no notice of the coach. Argentine skipper, Lionel Messi, recently exhibited an act of indiscipline during FC Barcelona’s latest LaLiga match, the superstar  was reportedly seen ignoring instructions from the club’s assistant manager, Eder Sarabia. Loading…last_img read more

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