first_imgAccording to expert Juan Arturo del Azar, he believes pilot David Ibbotson suffered from “spatial disorientation.”Spatial disorientation is defined as the inability of a pilot to correctly interpret aircraft attitude, altitude or airspeed in relation to the Earth or other points of reference.And for flying expert Juan Arturo Del Azar, the cause of the crash of a light aircraft in the English Channel carrying Argentinean footballer Emiliano Sala and English pilot David Ibbotson could be just that.“As in any investigation we can only speculate on what has been published until there’s official information,” Juan Arturo Del Azar was quoted by The Express.“But everything so far indicates there was an operation that should never have existed and a pilot who was not qualified to fly in the conditions there were that night.””The bulk of the plane was on the seabed and very few things were missing.” David Mearns, who led the privately-funded search for the plane that was carrying Emiliano Sala, explains how his team found and identified the wreckage pic.twitter.com/yEtnglCGlG— ZooM Harare (@ZoomHarare) February 5, 2019“What we know is that the pilot ‘requested descent’ on passing Guernsey,” he added.“I’ve flown that same route at least 400 times. It’s a crossing over water.”“The reason for requesting a descent, according to the aviation community, was because the plane was accumulating ice,” he explained.“But the information we have now is that this pilot was not authorized to fly with instruments.”AAIB responds to Sala’s family request to recover the plane’s wreckage Manuel R. Medina – August 14, 2019 The Air Accidents Investigation Branch says they already explained their decision not to recover the plane’s wreckage to Sala’s family and the pilot’s.“If that is the case, it could be a lot simpler. It could simply be a case of being in a cloud, not knowing how to fly with instruments and suffering what is called spatial disorientation,” Del Azar continued.“There’s a well-known incident, that of John Kennedy Jr, in which that happened.”“When a person is in a cloud and looks out of the window, they are disorientated. Then they have to know how to fly the plane looking just at the instruments,” he added.“If the information is correct and this pilot wasn’t qualified to fly with instruments, yes, there could have been ice.”“Your body sends you erroneous signals at that point. Your body tells you the plane is rising and the plane is falling and vice-versa,” the expert commented.“At that point, the only thing that is valid are the instruments. It’s something that’s very routine but it’s something for which a pilot must have a license and training.”“At night-time, everything is much more complicated. Ninety-five percent of accidents are human errors, errors by the pilot or maintenance errors. It’s not the planes’ fault. At times there are faults but they are a tiny minority, three to four percent,” he concluded.Emiliano Sala’s sister shared this photo yesterday of his dog still waiting for him to return…’Nala also waits for you’This is absolutely gutting 😔😔😔 pic.twitter.com/sV96ql2xnH— Footy Accumulators (@FootyAccums) February 5, 2019last_img