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Excessive Heat, Humidity Create Mosquito Dangers

first_img Community News 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Health Excessive Heat, Humidity Create Mosquito Dangers Published on Tuesday, August 21, 2012 | 3:32 am More Cool Stuff Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News HerbeautyHow To Lose Weight & Burn Fat While You SleepHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyGained Back All The Weight You Lost?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTiger Woods’ Ex Wife Found A New Love PartnerHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Subscribe Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Vector Control officials warn that ongoing high temperatures and excessive humidity are ideal conditions for both rapid mosquito reproduction and the diseases they can transmit.Los Angeles County is home to nearly 15 different mosquito species capable of transmitting many pathogens including West Nile (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) viruses, and malaria. The recent introduction of the invasive Asian tiger mosquito expands that list to include more than 20 other possible pathogens such as dengue and chikungunya viruses. Hotter, humid conditions allow both mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit to reproduce and spread faster.West Nile virus (WNV) is being actively transmitted by mosquitoes (primarily Culex spp.) in both the San Gabriel and San Fernando Valleys. With hotter temperatures, the virus is able to replicate faster in mosquitoes and can be transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes when they bite. Mosquitoes typically develop from egg to adult in 7 to 10 days. Higher temperatures and increased humidity allow mosquitoes to complete this cycle in as few as 5 days. Since each female mosquito can lay 200-300 eggs at a time in standing water, mosquito populations will explode if breeding continues unabated.The introduced Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) prefers humid climates typically found in the southern and eastern United States. Public Health officials worry that the monsoon-like conditions which are becoming more common each summer in the Los Angeles Basin will provide adequate humidity for this mosquito to thrive here as well.A study released by UCLA’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Mid-Century Warming in the Los Angeles Region, predicts the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys will see warmer temperatures overall, and the number of extreme hot days are projected to nearly quadruple by mid-century. Around the world, numerous studies have shown that climate change has extended both the range of vector populations and the scope of vector-borne disease risks.District’s Manager Kenn Fujioka states, “We are extremely concerned about the changing tide in vector control today. Serious outbreaks of WNV occur annually in Los Angeles County, and the prevalence of Asian tiger mosquitoes opens the door for emerging vector-borne diseases to arrive on our doorstep.” Home to one of the busiest airports in the world, new vector-borne diseases can be introduced simply with the arrival of an infected traveler.While the risks are truly global, the solutions are local. Mosquitoes thrive in urban areas because of the plethora of standing water humans provide. Additionally, many of the viruses they transmit are amplified in urban birds (crows, sparrows, and finches) that are present in large numbers because of plentiful food, nesting areas, and water available to them. This magnified vector-host combination increases the risk that vector-borne diseases will be transmitted in densely populated urban areas – exactly contrary to common public perception. When mosquito populations are low, pathogens are unable to spread rapidly and cause epidemics. Mosquito and vector control districts are integral in reducing these risks but are limited by relatively small staffs, fiscal and regulatory burdens, and difficulties accessing backyard breeding sites.Urban dwellers must understand these risks and how their daily decisions may contribute to disease transmission. Vector control officials urge all residents to pay close attention to these recommendations:• Keep outdoor areas free of accumulated belongings. Rain and sprinklers fill depressions, crevices, and containers and allow mosquitoes to reproduce.• Remove saucers and trays from under potted plants. Mosquitoes thrive even in small amounts of water.• Buckets used to water plants and root plant cuttings must be emptied completely and refilled at least twice-weekly, treated with larval pesticides, or stocked with mosquito-eating fish. Rain barrels/cisterns must be kept properly sealed and screened at all times.• Keep all pools, ponds, and fountains clean and in working order. Immature mosquitoes feed on algae and bacteria in standing water.• Prevent water from running off property and into gutters. Gutters and underground drainages provide ideal conditions for mosquito survival. Water collecting in swales must infiltrate within 96 hours.• Regularly clean and check yard drains and rain gutters to ensure water flows as designed. Leaves and grass clippings routinely clog drains allowing water to puddle and breed mosquitoes.• Avoid the use of birdfeeders and keep trash cans sealed tightly to prevent augmenting unnaturally high populations of virus-prone bird species (crows, sparrows, finches) which are key players in the WNV cycle.• Plant natives/drought tolerant vegetation to reduce water use and unintended runoff. Native plants will provide natural food sources for native birds and pollinating insect.• Avoid mosquito bites by applying repellents when outdoors and keeping doors and windows properly screened to keep mosquitoes out. Strong outdoor fans and citronella candles may reduce mosquito activity during outdoor gatherings. Electronic/ultrasonic devices are not effective.• Travelers to tropical/subtropical areas where mosquito-transmitted disease is active should check with medical professionals about pre-travel vaccinations/medications and actively use repellents to prevent bites. Seek prompt medical attention if illness develops within two weeks of return.We live in a global society and face new public health challenges related to a warming environment and rapid international travel and commerce. Protecting public health is everyone’s responsibility.The San Gabriel Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District is a public health agency dedicated to the control of mosquito and other vector-borne diseases.  The District can be reached at 626-814-9466 or on the web at www.sgvmosquito.org faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News Community Newslast_img read more

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Senate Banking Committee Discusses Regulatory Burden on Community Banks, Credit Unions

first_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Senate Banking Committee Discusses Regulatory Burden on Community Banks, Credit Unions Community Banks Credit Unions Regulatory Burdens Senate Banking Committee 2015-02-12 Brian Honea During a hearing spread out over two days at the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs on February 10 and 12, Committee chair Richard Shelby (R-Alabama) pointed out a “bipartisan understanding” that financial institutions need relief from perceived overregulation.The hearing, entitled “Regulatory Relief for Community Banks and Credit Unions,” was a gathering of the Committee’s lawmakers to discuss the effect of recent regulatory burdens placed on smaller banks and credit unions in response to the financial crisis.“As the hearing on Tuesday demonstrated, there is a bipartisan understanding that something must be done to relieve the regulatory burden on institutions that provide essential banking functions to communities across America,” Shelby said on Thursday, the second day of the hearing.Shelby said the purpose of the hearing was to focus on “unnecessary statutory and regulatory impediments” placed on community banks and credit unions, and he told the members of the Committee that “[a]lthough we may not agree on many things, I believe that we can all agree that community banks and credit unions play a vital role in our local economies.”Ed Templeton, Chairman of the National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU), testified to the committee that credit unions have a long history of helping the economy grow, and that “the need for regulatory relief is even stronger in 2015.” Templeton pointed out that 96 percent of the 1,100 federally insured credit unions that have gone out of existence since 2010 had assets of less than $100 million.“While NAFCU and its member credit unions take safety and soundness extremely seriously, the regulatory pendulum post-crisis has swung too far toward an environment of overregulation that threatens to stifle economic growth,” Templeton said in his testimony.Not everyone was convinced that the recent flurry of regulations enacted by such regulatory agencies as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) have hurt smaller financial institutions. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), a chief architect of the CFPB, pointed out to Daniel Blanton, chairman-elect of the American Bankers’ Association, that the earnings of community banks increased significantly in 2014 and even said they were doing “better than big banks.””We’ve heard a lot today about how smaller banks are being smothered by unnecessary regulation, supposedly because of Dodd-Frank rules, like the new mortgage rules that went into effect in the first quarter of 2014,” Warren said. “. . .[T]he banking industry did substantially better after the (CFPB’s) mortgage rules went into effect in January of 2014. Why are they making more money since the rules went into effect and are doing better than the big banks?”Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), ranking member of the Committee, told the lawmakers that Congress passed, and the President signed into law, several regulatory relief proposals that received bipartisan support.“If we hope to find consensus on more regulatory relief proposals for community banks and credit unions this Congress, we will need to engage in a process similar to the one that allowed these bills to make it across the finish line,” Brown said. “. . .The regulators understand the concerns being raised by community banks and credit unions – they made it clear in their testimony this week and in their actions over the past several months. They have responded by making – or considering – changes to their supervision and regulation of these institutions in a way that lessens their regulatory burden, while at the same time safeguarding safety and soundness and ensuring strong consumer protections.”Brown noted two such proposals that have been recently introduced. One of them is the Privacy Notice Bill, introduced by Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-North Dakota) and Jerry Moran (R-Kansas), which has 75 co-sponsors. This bill provides an exception to the annual written privacy notice requirement. The other proposal he mentioned, introduced by Brown himself during the last Congress, would allow privately insured credit unions to become members of the Federal Home Loan Bank System and would make it easier for credit unions to make small business loans and improve access to mortgages.While Brown spoke of regulatory relief proposals that had been introduced, at the same time he made it clear that he did not want to do anything that would erode Wall Street reform legislation such as Dodd-Frank.“And I want to reiterate that I am not interested in moving proposals that weaken or roll back Wall Street Reform, or undermine safety and soundness and consumer protection,” Brown said. “But, I think we should act on the proposals that we all agree, after fair consideration, will make a difference for the smallest institutions.” The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News About Author: Brian Honea Share Save  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Previous: CFPB Moves Against Three Lenders for Falsely Implying Government Representation Next: DS News Webcast: Friday 2/13/2015center_img Senate Banking Committee Discusses Regulatory Burden on Community Banks, Credit Unions Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Community Banks Credit Unions Regulatory Burdens Senate Banking Committee Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribe The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago February 12, 2015 912 Views last_img read more

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Justice Quince asks Bar to boost pro bono effort

first_img Justice Quince asks Bar to boost pro bono effort Gary Blankenship Senior Editor The Florida Bar should look at ways to boost pro bono work and contributions, continue its efforts at civic education for the public, and continue to protect the independence of the judicial branch. Supreme Court Justice Peggy Quince brought that message to the Bar Board of Governors at its February 17 meeting in Tallahassee, speaking for Chief Justice Barbara Pariente, who was unable to attend. At its annual Tallahassee meeting, the board traditionally hears from the chief justice. “I am really surprised that in our public schools, you only need half a credit in civics education and that’s late in the curriculum,” Quince said. “We need to start early so our young people understand the importance of the executive branch, the legislative branch, and the judicial branch and the part each plays.” The Bar’s recent efforts, which include surveys of citizens’ knowledge about government and the separation of powers and a public education campaign are helping, she said. “We think it is a good step toward making sure the people understand the importance of the three branchesof government,” Quince said. “It will increase the public’s trust and confidence in the judicial system and the public trust and confidence in lawyers, who are our judicial system.” The justice noted the board meeting came the day after annual pro bono awards were presented at the Supreme Court. The most recent figures show that Bar members contributed 1.5 million hours in pro bono work and $3.8 million to pro bono legal aid agencies. While impressive, “I think we can do even more,” Quince said, adding the numbers have been static for about three years. “We can get out of pro bono [work] by contributing $350. Well, $350 is probably less than many of you and many of your colleagues make in an hour,” Quince said. Given many unmet needs, the Bar should encourage its members to do more than the minimum of a $350 donation or 20 hours annually in the voluntary pro bono program, she said. “Only about 25 percent of the legal needs of our [poor] are being met and over half the children in our legal system have no lawyer or no guardian ad litem,” Quince said. “There’s a lot of work to be done, and with your help and the help of all of us who are members of The Florida Bar, we can get there.” On judicial independence, Quince said the court needs help both in responding to political attacks and in obtaining enough money to keep qualified staff. “Whether you agree or disagree with particular issues or opinions that come out isn’t really the issue. The issue is do we want to change our system because of a decision or a group of decisions,” the justice said. She noted that some politicians unhappy with court rulings have talked about changing the jurisdiction or rule-making authority of the court. “Those should not be based on whether any particular decision is popular or unpopular,” Quince said. Equally important is getting adequate salaries for court staff — a top priority of the court system in this year’s legislature. “The judicial budget represents about 0.6 percent of the entire state budget. That state budget is about $58 billion; the judicial budget is just over $400 million,” Quince said. “We need more money in the judicial budget just to take care of issues like parity pay for people who work for the court system.” She reported that court clerks get around $424 million — more than the courts — just for their court record-keeping and support functions. Clerks, and other state and local government agencies, also tend to pay better, making it difficult to keep good people in the court staff. “When you look at the court system, it consists of about 3,000 people. Half of the court’s budget goes to judicial salaries. It doesn’t leave a lot for operations or the salaries of other people in the courts,” Quince said. “We desperately need to upgrade the salaries of people who work for us because, quite frankly, now we cannot afford to keep people we need or compete for the well-qualified workers.” She closed her talk by thanking the Bar for its work in supporting the judicial system. Bar President Alan Bookman responded, “I pledge the Bar and the Board of Governors support in all the judiciary does. The right of the public to have a fair and impartial judiciary exceeds everything else.” March 15, 2006 Regular News Justice Quince asks Bar to boost pro bono effortlast_img read more

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CUNA engaged with House, Senate markups, hearings this week

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Both chambers of Congress are in session this week, and CUNA will be engaged with a number of hearings and other meetings throughout the week. These include a Wednesday markup of several bills by the Senate Commerce Committee, bills that include the Telephone Robocall Abuse Criminal Enforcement and Deterrence (TRACED) Act (S. 151).The TRACED Act aims to combat illegal robocalls, but CUNA has several concerns with the bill, including a lack of clarity on what constitutes “legal” calls and on any potential safe harbors.The House Ways and Mean Committee will also mark up several bills Tuesday, including the Taxpayer First Act of 2019 (H.R. 1957). The bill includes several measures designed to protect taxpayers from unfair practices and improve Internal Revenue Services operations and includes provisions related to suspected or actual “structuring transactions” and their treatment under the Bank Secrecy Act.last_img read more

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Logan Duffy scores first Indee IMCA Late Model win

first_imgBen Seemann led early before Johnson took the point. Johnson led until a restart late in the race and that is when Duffy used the low line of the multi-grooved track to shoot into the lead. Duffy appeared to have the feature in hand but two white flag cautions set up two green, white, check­ered restarts. The 16 year old Duffy was not to be denied in scoring his hard fought win over Jeff Aikey and Sean Johnson.   INDEPENDENCE, Iowa (June 13) – Saturday was a night for the record books at the Independ­ence Motor Speedway, with two bounties claimed and another set, plus hometowner Logan Duffy scored his first local win in the very tough IMCA Sunoco Late Model division.  Duffy started racing at his local track by jumping right into the Late Model division at the age of 14 with veterans like Jeff Aikey, Curt Martin, Greg Kastli, Sean Johnson and many more. Under the watchful eye of his grandfather and IMS Hall of Famer Gary Crawford, Duffy scored the 25-lap feature win on Saturday night. By Jerry Mackey Tony Olson accepted the promoter’s challenge by starting 21st on the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod grid, Olson was offered two times the finishing position money by starting the main event shot gun on the field. He worked to the front but was not able to catch strong running cousin Kyle Olson, who started on the outside front row and led the 20-lap main flag to flag. Kip Siems ran second ahead of Tony Olson.  In the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature, Scooter Dulin led early before Cole Mather was able to take control and go on to record his second consecutive win. The consecutive wins have earned Mather a bounty by promoter Mick Trier. Next week with 20 Stock Cars taking the green for the main event an extra $100 will be up for grabs to any driver who can stop Mather’s win streak. Mather scored the win Saturday night over Tom Schmitt and Bob Ahrendsen.  center_img The IMCA Modified 20 lap feature win on Saturday night went to Brennen Chipp. Chipp started seventh, steadily worked to the front and took the lead from Tony Snyder. Chipp went on to hold back the constant challenges of Ronn Lauritizen in getting to the checkers.  A total of 124 drivers signed in do battle.  The same offer was made to Kaden Reynolds in the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks following his two consecutive wins at IMS. Reynolds got all the way to the front and was looking at a big pay­day but Brett Vanous had other plans. Vanous and Reynolds raced the last two laps with some paint being traded. Vanous held off a last-lap charge by Reynolds in taking the win.last_img read more

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