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Commander of RBAF Receives Call from Commodore TNI-AL

first_img View post tag: call View post tag: RBAF March 25, 2012 View post tag: Navy View post tag: TNI-AL Commander of RBAF Receives Call from Commodore TNI-AL View post tag: Commodore Back to overview,Home naval-today Commander of RBAF Receives Call from Commodore TNI-AL View post tag: Naval Authorities View post tag: News by topic Share this article View post tag: Commander View post tag: receives The Commander of Royal Brunei Armed Forces (RBAF), Major General Dato Paduka Seri Haji Aminuddin Ihsan bin Pehin Orang Kaya Saiful Mulok Dato Seri Paduka Haji Abidin received a courtesy call from the Commodore Tentera Nasional Indonesia – Angkatan Laut (TNI-AL), His Excellency Commodore Pranyoto S.Pi., Commander of West Sea Security Task Force.His Excellency was in the country for five days bilateral naval exercise codenamed ‘HELANG LAUT 13B/12’ commencing from 19 to 23 March 2012. The exercise is the thirteenth series conducted annually between the two navies and this year is hosted by the Royal Brunei Navy (RBN).Also present were the Deputy Commander of RBAF, Yang Dimuliakan Pehin Datu Pekerma Jaya Brigadier General Dato Seri Pahlawan Mohd Tawih bin Abdullah, Deputy Commander of RBN Colonel(L) Haji Aznan bin Julaihi and RBAF senior officers. The meeting took place at Ministry of Defence, Bolkiah Garrison.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , March 25, 2012; Image: mindeflast_img read more

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UK: Piracy, Passenger Ship Safety High on Agenda of IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today UK: Piracy, Passenger Ship Safety High on Agenda of IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee View post tag: Naval View post tag: committee View post tag: safety View post tag: Passenger Piracy and armed robbery against ships off the coast of Somalia, in the Gulf of Aden and the wider Indian Ocean will be high on the agenda when IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) meets at the Organization’s London Headquarters for its 90th session from 16 to 25 May 2012.A High-Level Segment will be held on the opening day (16 May), intended to provide an opportunity for a full policy debate among Member Governments on how the international community should deal with issues related to the deployment of privately contracted armed security personnel (PCASP) on board ships and the carriage of arms on board.The MSC has also received a number of submissions under the agenda item on “passenger ship safety”, which was added to the agenda in the wake of the Costa Concordia incident in January.The busy agenda further includes the adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and consideration of other items submitted by the IMO Sub-Committees.Piracy and armed robbery against shipsThe high-level policy debate on arms on board ships, scheduled to take place on the first day of the MSC session, is expected to focus on a number of issues, including:• how Governments, either as flag States, coastal States, port States or States whose nationals are employed as seafarers, should acknowledge the actual situation and current developments with regard to employment of PCASP on board ships navigating in the high-risk area and whether they should allow PCASP under their national laws;• whether Governments, particularly coastal and port States, should allow passage of foreign ships with PCASP through their territorial waters; and whether any practical international guidance should be developed for the handling and treatment of firearms and PCASP on board ships navigating in territorial waters, including in ports of those States which have not yet established national policies in dealing with arms on board ships; and• whether Governments should establish international guidelines on the use of firearms against suspected pirates.The MSC will also review interim guidance for port and coastal States; flag States; and shipowners, ship operators and shipmasters on the use of PCASP on board ships to counter Somali-based piracy. This was approved by the Intersessional Maritime Security and Piracy Working Group of the MSC, which met in September 2011.Proposed Interim Guidance to private maritime security companies (PMSC) providing privately contracted armed security personnel (PCASP) aboard vessels transiting the high-risk area off the east coast of Africa will also be considered.Passenger ship safetyThe MSC will consider a number of submissions relating to passenger ship safety, after the item was added onto the agenda in the wake of the Costa Concordia incident off the coast of Italy in January of this year. The MSC is also expected to receive an update from the Government of Italy on the status of the casualty investigation. IMO is represented, as an observer, on the body overseeing the casualty investigation.It is anticipated that the MSC will also prepare an action plan to ensure a prompt response to the Costa Concordia incident and consider any other concerns associated with passenger ship safety.Adoption of SOLAS amendmentsThe MSC will be invited to consider, for adoption, draft amendments to:• SOLAS regulation II 1/8-1, to introduce a mandatory requirement for new passenger ships for either onboard stability computers or shore-based support, for the purpose of providing operational information to the Master for safe return to port after a flooding casualty;• SOLAS chapter II-2 relating to protection of vehicle, special category and ro–ro spaces, including revised requirements for fire extinguishing systems;• SOLAS regulation III/20.11.2 regarding the testing of free-fall lifeboats, to require that the operational testing of free-fall lifeboat release systems shall be performed either by free-fall launch with only the operating crew on board or by a simulated launching;• SOLAS regulation V/14 on ships’ manning, to require Administrations, for every ship, to establish appropriate minimum safe manning levels following a transparent procedure, taking into account the guidance adopted by IMO (Assembly resolution A.1047(27) on Principles of minimum safe manning); and issue an appropriate minimum safe manning document or equivalent as evidence of the minimum safe manning considered necessary;• SOLAS chapter VI to add a new SOLAS regulation VI/5-2, to make mandatory the prohibition of blending of bulk liquid cargoes during the sea voyage and to prohibit production processes on board ships;• SOLAS chapter VII to replace regulation 4 on documents, covering transport information relating to the carriage of dangerous goods in packaged form and the container/vehicle packing certificate; and• SOLAS chapter XI-1 regulation XI-1/2 on enhanced surveys to make mandatory the International Code on the Enhanced Programme of Inspections during Surveys of Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers, 2011 (2011 ESP Code), adopted by resolution A.1049(27).Adoption of Load Lines amendmentsThe MSC is expected to adopt draft amendments to regulation 47 of the International Convention on Load Lines (LL), 1966 and the 1988 LL Protocol, to shift the Winter Seasonal Zone off the southern tip of Africa further southward by 50 miles.The amendments to the Convention will then also be submitted to the next session of the IMO Assembly for adoption, as required by the Convention.LRIT status to be updatedThe MSC will be updated on developments in relation to the establishment and testing of LRIT Data Centres (DCs) and the operation of the LRIT system since its last session.STCW Convention: independent evaluations to be consideredThe MSC is expected to consider the Secretary-General’s report on a number of countries whose independent evaluations have been completed since the previous MSC meeting and to confirm if those Parties continue to give full and complete effect to the provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended.Other issuesIn connection with other issues arising from the reports of IMO Sub-Committees and other bodies, the MSC will be invited to:• Adopt revised performance standards for voyage data recorders (VDRs) to update the current performance standards (resolution A.861(20), as amended by resolution MSC.214(81)) and provide for VDRs to continuously maintain sequential records of preselected data items relating to the status and output of the ship’s equipment, and command and control of the ship in a fixed recording medium; a float-free recording medium; and a long-term recording medium.• Adopt several new and amended ships’ routeing measures.• Approve, for future adoption, new draft SOLAS requirements (new regulation III/17-1) to require ships to have plans and procedures to recover persons from the water, as well as related Guidelines for development of plans and procedures for recovery of persons from the water. Also, to approve a draft MSC resolution on Implementation of SOLAS regulation III/17-1 to ships other than those engaged in international voyages.• Approve the draft revised Code on noise levels on board ships, which sets out mandatory noise level limits for machinery spaces, control rooms, workshops, accommodation and other spaces on board ships, updates and revises the previous version published in 1973 (resolution A.468(XII)). Also, to approve for future adoption a related draft new SOLAS regulation II-1/3 12 to require new ships to be constructed to reduce onboard noise and to protect personnel from noise, in accordance with the Code.• Approve Unified Interpretations of the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972, as amended (COLREG), relating to navigation-light arrangements (described in Annex I/9(a)(i) and 10(a)(i) of COLREG).• Approve a draft MSC circular on Pilot transfer arrangements, which includes a revised graphic depiction of required boarding arrangements for pilots, reflecting amendments adopted to SOLAS regulation V/23 by MSC 88 in 2010 and Assembly resolution A.1045(27) on Pilot transfer arrangements.• Adopt a draft MSC resolution on amendments to performance standards for speed and distance measuring equipment, to add a new paragraph referring to the need for two separate devices, if ships are required to carry speed logs measuring speed through the water and speed over the ground. Also, to approve a related draft MSC circular on the interpretation of SOLAS regulation V/19.2.9.2, to clarify the requirement for two separate devices.• Adopt amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code), relating to fixed gas fire-extinguishing systems; fixed pressure water-spraying and water-mist fire-extinguishing systems; and automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm systems.• Approve draft MSC circulars on Revised Guidelines for the design and approval of fixed water-based fire-fighting systems for ro-ro spaces and special category spaces; Guidelines for the approval of helicopter facility foam fire-fighting appliances; and Revised Guidelines for the maintenance and inspection of fire-protection systems and appliances.• Adopt draft amendment 36-12 to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and supplements, including harmonization of the Code with the amendments to the UN Recommendations on the transport of dangerous goods, seventeenth revised edition.• Adopt draft amendments to the Guidelines for the design and construction of offshore supply vessels, 2006 (resolution MSC.235(82)), concerning damage stability standards.• Approve for future adoption draft amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/10 on fire fighting to require a minimum of duplicate two-way portable radiotelephone apparatus for fire fighters’ communication to be carried; and draft amendments to regulation II-2/15 Instructions, on-board training and drills, to require an onboard means of recharging breathing apparatus cylinders used during drills, or a suitable number of spare cylinders.• Approve a draft MSC circular on Basic Safety Guidance for yacht races or oceanic voyages by non-regulated crafts.• Approve draft amendments to the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual for inclusion in the 2013 edition of the IAMSAR Manual. The draft amendments include revised paragraphs relating to common language (English serves as the default SAR operational language in all cross-boundary operations where there is no other common language) and references to 406 MHz Distress Beacons.• Approve a draft MSC circular on Revised Guidelines on annual testing of 406 MHz satellite EPIRBs.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , May 09, 2012; UK: Piracy, Passenger Ship Safety High on Agenda of IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee View post tag: piracy View post tag: IMO May 9, 2012center_img Industry news View post tag: High View post tag: Navy Share this article View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Agenda View post tag: Maritime View post tag: shiplast_img read more

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U.S. DoD Awards Contract Modification to ManTech

first_img Industry news U.S. DoD Awards Contract Modification to ManTech View post tag: U.S. Back to overview,Home naval-today U.S. DoD Awards Contract Modification to ManTech View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy Share this article View post tag: DoD View post tag: ManTechcenter_img View post tag: usa ManTech Systems Engineering Corp., Fairfax, Va., is being awarded an $8,167,344 modification to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract  for the procurement of warfare analysis, modeling and simulation, software development, and analytic program support for the Naval Air Systems Command’s Warfare Analysis and Integration Department, the U.S. Department of Defence announced.Work will be performed in Patuxent River, Md., and is expected to be completed in May 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. No funds will be obligated at time of award.The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 28, 2012 View post tag: awards View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Modification August 28, 2012 View post tag: contractlast_img read more

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Keel Laid for USNS Lewis B. Puller

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Keel Laid for USNS Lewis B. Puller General Dynamics NASSCO yesterday hosted a keel laying ceremony for the USNS Lewis B. Puller, the third ship in the Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) class. The ship is named in honor of Lewis B. Puller, the most decorated U.S. Marine in history and the only one to be awarded five Navy Crosses. Mrs. Elizabeth Glueck was the honoree for the keel-laying ceremony.She is the wife of Lieutenant General Kenneth J. Glueck, Jr., deputy commandant for Combat Development and Integration; commanding general, Marine Corps Combat Development Command; and commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Strategic Command.Mrs. Glueck validated the ship’s keel by welding her initials onto a steel plate which will be permanently affixed to the ship, remaining with the vessel throughout its time in service.MLP-3 is the first ship of the class to be configured as an Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB). Delivery is scheduled for the second quarter of 2015. “This third Mobile Landing Platform ship, configured as an AFSB, will provide significant new capability to the Navy and Marine Corps’ Maritime Prepositioning Force,” said Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics NASSCO. “The NASSCO team will continue to efficiently build and deliver these ships to help strengthen the forward presence of the Navy.”The MLP AFSB is a flexible platform and a key element in the Navy’s large-scale airborne mine countermeasure mission. The ship is designed to facilitate a wide variety of future mission sets in support of special operations. With accommodations for 250 personnel and a huge helicopter flight deck, the MLP AFSB will provide a highly capable and affordable asset to the Navy and Marine Corps.[mappress]Press Release, November 6, 2013; Image: NASSCO Industry news November 6, 2013center_img Keel Laid for USNS Lewis B. Puller Share this articlelast_img read more

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HMAS Success Supports Maritime Security Ops

first_img Authorities Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Success Supports Maritime Security Ops HMAS Success Supports Maritime Security Ops The Royal Australian Navy’s oiler and replenishment ship HMAS Success has been very busy lately, not only delivering vital fuel and other goods to warships operating in the Middle East, but also delivering key operational effects under the Canadian-led Combined Task Force 150 (CTF-150).Captain Nick Stoker from the Royal Australian Navy is currently the Deputy Commander of CTF-150. He said:Multi role, highly capable ships such as HMAS Success can undertake a wide range of missions with great efficiency and flexibility.For example, HMAS Success has provided outstanding support to counter-terrorism operations while continuing to deliver in her primary role as a replenishment oiler for Task Force 53.HMAS Success is patrolling the Middle East’s busiest waterways in support of maritime security operations. The ship helps to ensure security, safety and freedom of navigation for commercial shipping in international waters, as well as building positive relations with local fishermen and merchants, developing CTF-150’s understanding of the maritime environment in the region.HMAS Success is contributing to CTF-150’s focused efforts to intensify maritime security and counter-terrorism operations in order to deter and disrupt terrorist organisations from making illicit uses the seas to conceal their movements and funding.Image: CMF View post tag: Australian Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: Maritime View post tag: Supportscenter_img View post tag: HMAS Success View post tag: Navy February 3, 2015 View post tag: Ops View post tag: Security View post tag: middle east View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

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USCG’s Fifth Cutter Ends Builder’s Trials

first_img View post tag: fifth View post tag: Cutter View post tag: Navy April 8, 2015 U.S. Coast Guard’s fifth National Security Cutter, James, successfully completed builder’s trials in Pascagoula, Mississippi, marking a significant step in preparing the cutter for delivery to the U.S. Coast Guard.Builder’s trials are the shipbuilder’s first opportunity to operate the cutter at sea and survey the current status of shipboard systems.While underway, Huntington Ingalls Industries test and trials team conducted extensive testing of the propulsion, electrical, damage control, anchor handling, small boat operations and combat systems. This culminated in the successful completion of a four-hour, full-power propulsion run.Preparations for acceptance trials, conducted by the Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey, can now begin with the successful completion of the builder’s trials.James is the fifth of eight planned National Security Cutters and the second to be home ported on the East Coast. At 418 feet and 4,500 tons, the Legend-class National Security Cutter is the centerpiece of the Coast Guard fleet.[mappress mapid=”15610″]Image: HII Back to overview,Home naval-today USCG’s Fifth Cutter Ends Builder’s Trials View post tag: News by topic View post tag: USCG Share this article View post tag: Builder’s Trials Authorities USCG’s Fifth Cutter Ends Builder’s Trials View post tag: americaslast_img read more

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USS Zumwalt ready for final trip before commissioning

first_img Authorities USS Zumwalt ready for final trip before commissioning Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Zumwalt ready for final trip before commissioning October 7, 2016 View post tag: US Navycenter_img U.S. Navy’s biggest destroyer to date, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is ready to depart Naval Station Norfolk October 7 and complete a one-day transit to Baltimore, Md., where it will be commissioned into active service on October 15.This means that the sailors and engineers have carried out repairs to the ship’s engineering plant where a seawater leak in a propulsion motor drive lube oil auxiliary system was found on September 19, during sea trials.Zumwalt was originally scheduled to depart Norfolk on October 9 but, with the approach of Hurricane Matthew, the Navy decided to move up the ship’s departure and complete preparations for the commissioning ceremony in Baltimore.The lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers, Zumwalt is the Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced surface ship. Measuring 610 feet in length and 80.7 in width, Zumwalt is larger than the current Arleigh Burke-class destroyers which are 505 ft long and 66 ft wide.Zumwalt is 100 feet longer and 13 feet wider, and its flight deck is 93 percent larger than that of an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer.The construction of the ship began in February 2009 at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard. Four years later, the destroyer was launched in October 2013 and then christened in April 2014.Initially, 32 Zumwalt destroyers were supposed to be built. Over the years the number, however, declined to three vessels. View post tag: USS Zumwalt Share this articlelast_img read more

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USCG receives Fast Response Cutter, USCGC Jacob Poroo

first_img Bollinger Shipyards has delivered the USCGC JACOB POROO, the 25th Fast Response Cutter (FRC) to the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard took delivery on the 5th of September 2017 in Key West, Florida. The vessel’s commissioning is scheduled for the 8th of November in New Orleans, Louisiana.“We are excited to announce the delivery of the latest FRC, the USCGC JACOB POROO,” said Ben Bordelon, Bollinger President & C.E.O. “This FRC built by Bollinger Shipyards will be the second FRC to be stationed in Pascagoula, MS. Previous cutters have been stationed in Florida, San Juan, PR, Cape May, NJ, Ketchikan, Alaska, Pascagoula, MS and Honolulu, HI. FRCs already in commission have seized multiple tons of narcotics, interdicted thousands of illegal aliens and saved many lives. The FRC program is a model program for government acquisition and has surpassed all historical quality benchmarks for vessels of this type and complexity. The results are the delivery of truly extraordinary Coast Guard cutters that will serve our Nation for decades to come. As we reflect on the U.S. Coast Guard’s importance to our Nation framed by the Coast Guard’s heroic response to Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Louisiana, we are extremely proud that the Fast Response Cutters built by Louisiana craftsmen here at Bollinger Shipyards are having such a major impact on our country’s safety and security.”The 154 foot patrol craft USCGC JACOB POROO is the 25th vessel in the Coast Guard’s Sentinel-class FRC program. The FRC has been described as an operational “game changer,” by senior Coast Guard officials. To build the FRC, Bollinger used a proven, in-service parent craft design based on the Damen Stan Patrol Boat 4708. It has a flank speed of 28 knots, state of the art command, control, communications and computer technology, and a stern launch system for the vessel’s 26 foot cutter boat.Each FRC is named for an enlisted Coast Guard hero who distinguished him or herself in the line of duty. This vessel is named after Coast Guard Hero Jacob Poroo. For heroic and courageous action during his efforts to attempt a rescue and respond to a major building fire at the LORAN station in Adak, Alaska in 1968, Poroo was posthumously awarded the Coast Guard Medal. Training & Education Back to overview,Home naval-today USCG receives Fast Response Cutter, USCGC Jacob Poroo September 7, 2017 USCG receives Fast Response Cutter, USCGC Jacob Poroocenter_img View post tag: USCGC Jacob Poroo Share this article View post tag: US Coast Guardlast_img read more

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Dutch naval ships will not take part in Atalanta in 2018

first_img View post tag: Royal Netherlands Navy Share this article Dutch naval ships will not take part in Atalanta in 2018 Back to overview,Home naval-today Dutch naval ships will not take part in Atalanta in 2018 Dutch naval vessels will not participate in the European Union’s counter-piracy operation Atalanta off the coast of Somalia this year.This was stated in a letter sent by Ank Bijleveld-Schouten, the country’s Minister of Defense, to the lower house of the Dutch parliament on March 7.Problems with the patrol vessels, personnel shortages and other NATO obligations are mentioned as reasons, according to the Royal Netherlands Navy.The Netherlands has been deploying naval vessels since 2009 as part of the European Union’s mission to prevent piracy and armed robbery off the Horn of Africa.The European Union Naval Force (Op Atalanta) Somalia – Operation Atalanta, was launched in December 2008. Its objectives are protecting vessels of the World Food Programme (WFP) and other vulnerable shipping, determent and disruption of piracy and armed robbery at sea and monitoring fishing activities off Somalia.Naval Today Staffcenter_img View post tag: Operation Atalanta March 9, 2018 Authoritieslast_img read more

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Australian Navy concludes exercise Sea Explorer

first_img View post tag: Royal Australian Navy View post tag: Sea Explorer The Royal Australian Navy has concluded the amphibious exercise Sea Explorer off the coast of Queensland.The exercise was held over the anniversary of the D-Day landings, which took place on the 6th June 1944 on the coast of France.Commander of the Amphibious Task Group, Captain Paul O’Grady, acknowledged both the historic significance of the exercise as well as the importance of support from the community.“Sea Explorer 2018 coincided with the anniversary of the D-Day landings which of course was the largest amphibious operation in history,” he said.“Some 500 Australian sailors participated in D-Day, with the Royal Navy operating landing craft with similarity to the landing craft activity that has been undertaken with this exercise.”HMAS Choules was among ships participating in the exercise, having just completed another amphibious activity during exercise Croix du Sud in New Caledonia. But it was Navy’s LHD HMAS Canberra which was centrepiece to the exercise with aircraft and landing craft being deployed on a constant basis to move and support troops as they made landings along the coastline around Bowen.Commander Landing Force, Colonel Malcolm Wells said Sea Explorer provided a first-class opportunity to continue the ADF’s development of a full-spectrum, truly joint, amphibious capability.“Each time we do this our understanding of each Service grows,” COL Wells said.“Unquestionably this is a joint endeavour and not possible without the full cooperation of each Service.”Exercise Sea Explorer also involved significant efforts ashore. The Amphibious Task Group (ATG) itself is based at Fleet Headquarters in Sydney. They are an integral part of the Fleet Battle Staff in the COMWAR Branch. The ATG Headquarters typically comprises a standing staff of 60 personnel from across Navy, Army and Airforce with a diverse array of ranks and specialisations represented.“Our people are permanently on 48 hours notice to move for a range of situations,” CAPT O’Grady said.“In fact, our staff can double in size to well over 100 for activities such as the Sea Series and major Exercises such as Talisman Sabre.“I am very proud of our people’s ability to plan, adapt to and execute complex amphibious activities across the full spectrum of operations.” Photo: Soldiers from the Ground Combat Element of the Australian Amphibious Force move ashore from landing craft during exercise Sea Explorer 2018. Photo: Royal Australian Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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