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Nairn’s partners with Amanda Hamilton to launch new campaign

first_imgManufacturer Nairn’s has partnered with Scottish broadcaster and nutritionist Amanda Hamilton for its new Naturally Energising Challenge campaign.The six-week programme has been created to promote health and nutrition to families with young children around the UK. “We’re delighted to be working with Amanda on this campaign, which is dedicated to supporting families – a significant consumer group for us,” said Nairn’s marketing head Emma Heath.“Our Naturally Energising Challenge breaks nutrition down into a simple language, and takes healthy eating and active living right back to basics.”Consumers who take advantage of the free subscription to the campaign will be delivered nutritional advice and tips from Hamilton through a series of six weekly emails, which will have a different focus each week.Hamilton commented: “The tips I have learned as a mum and nutritionist – some of which I share in the Naturally Energising Challenge Series – aim to lend a helping hand to all the busy parents out there.“This is my second year of working with Nairn’s – a brand I love and whose products have always been staples in my shopping basket. We share many philosophies where nutrition is concerned – and together we can show that small changes really can make a big difference.”Nairn’s was recently featured as a case study in the UK Food and Drink: International Action Plan for its success in the export market.last_img read more

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Letter from the Editor: The Homelessness Hero, November 2014

first_imgThe Homelessness HeroA few years ago, I decided to go homeless for three days. It was an artificial homelessness, because I knew that after 72 hours I could go back to a warm bed and a fridge full of food. But the people I met — and the misery they experience — were very real. They were not the lazy alcoholics and drug addicts I’d assumed them to be. They were ordinary people looking desperately for jobs but not getting them, mainly because they had no permanent address. Many had kids whom they called from payphones. All were ashamed of their situation.I decided to go homeless because I wanted to feel human again. For a few days, I wanted to close the widening gap between rich and poor, suburbanite and street dweller. Wealthy Americans consume over half of the world’s resources, while one billion people starve. Within our own borders, 3.5 million Americans sleep on the streets or in shelters each night, and nearly 20 percent of Americans go hungry. Most of them are children.For too long, I’d rationalized away these kinds of statistics: they need to get jobs and make better choices, I figured. It wasn’t until I spent three days on the streets that I realized the hollowness of my rationalizations. These facts have faces. These people are human beings, just like me.Homeless people are the ultimate endurance athletes and outdoor adventurists, I discovered. They hike for miles every day and camp out under the stars each night. They can start a campfire with a single match and a few twigs, and they can forage for food and wild edibles better than most mushroom-gathering hippies. They are thru-hikers without a Katahdin, trudging daily through rain and snow in search of their next meal or job interview.I wrote about my homeless experience for the magazine last year. The story received some decent feedback and thought-provoking chatter on the site, and I figured that was the end of it.But then an amazing thing happened. After reading the story, an avid outdoor enthusiast from Virginia named Chris Finlay decided to do something about it. He started a nonprofit called Shelters to Shutters, which provides housing and employment to the homeless. It’s a sustainable, scalable model built upon partnerships with apartment companies throughout the region. Shelters to Shutters now assists the homeless in several cities in North Carolina and Tennessee with plans to expand beyond the Blue Ridge.As a writer for over two decades, I’ve published hundreds of stories. Rarely do I see any lasting impact from them. It’s incredibly heartening to know that there are people like Chris Finlay, who find inspiration and then act on it.I am deeply grateful to all of the Chris Finlays out there who don’t just read about problems but do the hard work of creating solutions. Their stories don’t always get told; they’re often too busy working behind the scenes to help others or protect species or safeguard rivers. But they are the true heroes of our mountains and our magazine.last_img read more

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Two-level Griffin home sells to a family for $940k

first_imgThe house at 1002 Dohles Rocks Rd, Griffin, sold for $940,000.A WATERFRONT property at Griffin has sold for $940,000.The two-level house at 1002 Dohles Rocks Rd had “in excess” of 50 groups through at inspections, and a number of written offers, before the sellers accepted the $940,000 offer last month. One of the bedrooms at 1002 Dohles Rocks Rd, Griffin.LJ Hooker Kallangur and Murrumba Downs agent Chris Pascoe said the house was bought by a local family.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019“They were down there having lunch and noticed the sign out the front,” Mr Pascoe said.“They enjoyed the views and the beautiful breezes.” The ensuite is large.The house had three bedrooms upstairs, including the main with an ensuite and walk-in wardrobe, and an open-plan kitchen, living and dining area.There was also a separate dining area, bathroom and laundry on this level.Downstairs was another living area, this one with a kitchenette, two more bedrooms and a bathroom.center_img Another bathroom at Dohles Rocks Rd.There was a triple garage and the house was on the waterfront of North Pine River. Mr Pascoe said four bedroom, two bathroom homes on a 600sq m block were in high demand at present.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:18Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:18 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels576p576p400p400p320p320p228p228pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenReal estate – Prestige Listings – Elizabeth Tilley04:19last_img read more

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Entrepreneur employs dogs to look for oil and gas pipeline leaks

first_imgA “driven” personality is also important.“If I hid a ball, they won’t just go crazy looking in the room looking for a ball. They actually will be very studious in looking all areas for this ball,” says Mistafa.“If a dog can do that on his own, then that’s perfect. That’s the personality I want.” CALGARY, A.B. – A Calgary-based entrepreneur is enlisting the acute sense of smell of man’s best friend to search for oil and gas pipeline leaks.For the past two decades, Ron Mistafa has run Detector Dog Services International, which helps clients in the oil and gas sector to search out pipeline leaks, drugs and explosives.Mistafa has two dogs working for him: A yellow lab named Duke who specialises in looking for pipeline leak jobs, and George, a lab cross who specializes in drugs and explosives. Both live with Mistafa, along with a retired springer spaniel named Toby.- Advertisement -Mistafa figures Duke gets only about five per cent of the work. In a good year, that’s about five or six jobs. The vast majority of demand is from companies wanting George’s help in ridding work camps of illicit items.Mistafa spent several years in the Calgary police K-9 unit followed by a stint training dog handlers in landmine detection in Bosnia.He runs Duke through the oil-searching exercise about once or twice a week to keep the dog’s skills sharp, using a jar of crude oil as the bait.Advertisement The benzene in the jar of crude is what gets Duke’s nose twitching. When an active pipeline is leaking below ground, Duke can smell the gases that emanate to the surface. For pipelines that aren’t carrying any product, Mistafa will mix a substance called mercaptan – the same rotten-egg smell when a gas stove has been left on or a furnace is leaking – into pressurized air or water, enabling Duke to detect a potential leak.An assignment can involve Mistafa walking Duke for several hours along a pipeline right-of-way in remote locales, with rest and water breaks along the way.He says dogs aren’t used as widely for this purpose as he thinks they should be, with many industry players tending to prefer more high-tech methods.Canada’s two biggest pipeline firms say they don’t have dogs as a regular part of their leak-detection arsenal.Advertisementcenter_img TransCanada spokesperson Mark Cooper says the company has many overlapping methods to detect leaks. “While dogs aren’t a regular part of our multi-layered strategy, the use of canine sniffing is something that we recognize as a legitimate tool that can be added to supplement our toolbox in certain situations,” he says.“We’d obviously note that dogs are used around the world as an integrated part of security at major international airports and it is certainly not surprising to see their keen senses being applied to many other uses.”Enbridge spokesperson Graham White says the company’s existing leak detection methods are “proven and effective.” Among other things, Enbridge uses computer-based monitoring, aerial and ground patrols and acoustic devices.Mistafa gets his dogs from rescue organizations. He’s on the lookout for raw talent.“I compare the dogs to the Wayne Gretzky of hockey players. You didn’t have to teach Wayne Gretzky or Gordie Howe all that much. It was natural to them and that’s what I look for in a dog – something that’s natural,” he said.Advertisementlast_img read more

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