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Roundtable Friday: if you were Gundy, who would you start at QB?

first_imgIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers! PistolsboyIf I was Gundy I guess that would mean I have Alex Cate > Brandon Weeden on my resume so I’m not sure how seriously everybody should take me.That being said, I think if I was Gundy I would probably start Clint Chelf. Our $3+ million man needs a solid campaign after that 8-5 train wreck last season and Chelf is the safest choice. Last year I said Gundy should start Lunt, and he did, because last year didn’t matter — OSU wasn’t going to win the Big 12 even if Brandon Weeden somehow got another year of eligibility.This is not the year to take a chance like that again — and nobody can convince me that Lunt isn’t at least a little bit of a chance, a wild card if you will.This year, Gundy seems to think OSU has a defense that can deliver Big 12 title No. 2 in three years. And if he genuinely thinks that (which…who knows?) then roll Chelf out there. You know what you’re getting with him, you know who you’re getting from him, and with a little bit of luck you can steer the ship to the promise land once again.I honestly don’t think J.W. is really in the mix for the starting job, what’s weird is that Lunt could either win a Big 12 title this year or not be allowed to play (because of a redshirt) based on whatever Gundy feels like doing over the next few months. I could not handle those emotional swings — this is why I write and don’t play (among many, many reasons).All of this probably means…”welcome to Houston, folks. Your starting quarterback for the Oklahoma State Cowboys — Daxx Garman!!”Amilian*Disclaimer:  I didn’t watch the scrimmage nor did I read anything about it except for a couple headlines that claimed defense won. I don’t think you can pick one of these QBs and say he’s going to get you X number of more wins than the other two. Any of these three guys give us a chance to win every game on the schedule. Winning this year is the most important factor, but we have to move to the next bullet on the priority list: winning next year and the year after. Lunt has a higher ceiling than Walsh and I can’t name many teams who have had huge seasons with a 200-pound scrambling quarterback.If I’m Gundy, I go with Lunt because he’s better suited for the style of offense I want this team to play.  Do we want a Weeden offense or a Zac offense? We recruited the WR position so well and those weapons are under-utilized with a weaker arm. Develop Lunt and have a Weeden-caliber QB in 2014 and 2015. Photo Attribution: USATSIPhoto Attribution: USATSINot who you think should start or who you want to start, but who you would start at QB if your name was Mike Gundy and you were getting $250,000 checks every month.OKC DaveDon’t make this harder than it needs to be. Chelf is a senior who has proven himself very capable to give us a great season. You insert Walsh in the same package we used last year, and you redshirt Lunt and tell him he’s got three years ahead of him at starting QB if he keeps up the hard work.last_img read more

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Farmers to Learn about Climate-Smart Agricultural Practices

first_img Some 5,000 farmers from the parishes of St. Thomas, St. Mary and Portland are to benefit from a €400,000 (J$5.6-million) project, aimed at increasing their capacity to implement climate-smart agricultural practices. He was speaking to JIS News during the National Conference on ‘Accelerating the Application of Climate-smart Agriculture Innovations and/or Technologies’, at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston on March 25.Mr. Thompson said while the bulk of the island’s production is from the parishes of St. Elizabeth, Manchester and Trelawny, the targeted parishes have also contributed significantly to the sector.“When we look at the three regions, St. Mary to a lesser extent, we see the state of degradation in those parishes – slash and burn, malpractices on the steep hillsides and continuous bush fires during periods of drought. We need to educate farmers that bush fires should not be used as a means of clearing land for production, because you destroy the biological agents in the soil that help in the building of the soil for it to be more fertile,” he said.Mr. Thompson encouraged farmers to utilise methods such as contour cropping, and barrier farming, which will serve as a protector to soil movement.Mr. Thompson noted that climate change is threatening the food security in the country, and so farmers need to be properly educated to address the issues.“What we are trying to do is to educate the farmers on how to be more resilient, so we take into consideration their knowledge and how to go forward with that knowledge in terms of implementing strategies,” he said.Meanwhile, Senior Director, Adaptation, Climate Change Division, Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Le-Anne Roper, said the programme is building the capacity of the farmers.“The farmers will also be trained to better use information and communication technology and to innovate in their practices,” she said.Climate-smart agriculture has been developed as an approach to attain ‘triple wins’ in agriculture, through increased agricultural productivity, adaptation (supporting crops and livestock to grow in changing climatic conditions) and mitigation (reducing greenhouse gas emissions where possible). The project is being funded by the Technical Centre for Agriculture and Rural Cooperation (CTA), based in the Netherlands. Dubbed, ‘Accelerating the Uptake of Climate-smart Agriculture in Jamaica’, the project is to strengthen the resilience to climate extremes and improve agricultural productivity and incomes of smallholder farmers in Jamaica through the promotion of widespread adoption of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices that are most aligned with national policy priorities.center_img Some 5,000 farmers from the parishes of St. Thomas, St. Mary and Portland are to benefit from a €400,000 (J$5.6-million) project, aimed at increasing their capacity to implement climate-smart agricultural practices.Dubbed, ‘Accelerating the Uptake of Climate-smart Agriculture in Jamaica’, the project is to strengthen the resilience to climate extremes and improve agricultural productivity and incomes of smallholder farmers in Jamaica through the promotion of widespread adoption of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices that are most aligned with national policy priorities.The project is being funded by the Technical Centre for Agriculture and Rural Cooperation (CTA), based in the Netherlands.Chief Executive Officer, Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA), Peter Thompson said increased adoption of climate-smart agricultural practices in those parishes is critical and will guide farmers in using best practices for farming.Chief Executive Officer, Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA), Peter Thompson (left), listens keenly to Senior Director, Technology, Training and Technical Information, RADA, Winston Shaw, during the National Conference on ‘Accelerating the Application of Climate-smart Agriculture Innovations and/or Technologies’, at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston, on March 25. Story Highlightslast_img read more

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OMG … Is this for real Cree man learns he won court

first_imgKenneth Jackson APTN National NewsOn day parole in an Edmonton halfway house, Frank Okimaw learned Thursday night he may not have to return for curfew.That’s because he won an appeal lowering his sentence for aggravated assault and weapon charges Aug. 19, only no one had told him.Okimaw got the news from an APTN reporter writing him on Facebook about the case having read the Court of Appeal of Alberta decision, and sent it to him to confirm.“Yes that’s me,” he wrote. “Is this for real?”Very real, but there’s more.No one had also told Okimaw‎ his appeal was being heard in June, as he thought he applied too late.“I didn’t know I was going for an appeal till you just told me,” he said. “I’ll let my parole officer know in the morning. This is crazy.”Okimaw was sentenced in November to 30 months, with a credit of seven and half months of time already served. That lowered his actual sentence to 22.5 months in provincial custody stemming from an incident at an Edmonton liquor store in 2013.The court of appeal essentially lowered the sentence to 13.5 months, meaning he should be able to leave the halfway house, as his original statutory release was in January.After sentencing Okimaw applied to Legal Aid to have them fund his appeal and never heard anything back. He got day parole in March and said he never thought of the appeal again.Legal Aid picked Edmonton lawyer Graham Johnson to represent Okimaw at his appeal. Johnson told APTN he had no way of reaching Okimaw but had been trying to since the appellate court’s decision.“By the time I got appointed to act he was no longer at whatever remand centre he was in when he first applied for coverage, so I had no contact information from him,” said Johnson.He said if Okimaw had still been in custody he would have found out right away.“But I guess he was already on parole, so wouldn’t have automatically found out. I’m happy you managed to track him down,” said Johnson.So not only did Okimaw win, but his case could be the “roadmap” for sentencing judges with Indigenous offenders in their court.The court of appeal found Okimaw is the “artefact” of colonization in a detailed decision outlining how Okimaw’s life is the prime example of how Gladue principles should be applied to Indigenous offenders.“Our hope … is that these reasons may succeed in providing a useful roadmap to sentencing judges when crafting a sentence for an Aboriginal offender,” wrote the panel of three judges in its unanimous decision.The sentencing judge found Okimaw’s past, severely affected by residential schools and colonization, didn’t lessen his “moral blameworthiness” and the sentence needed to fit the crime. The appellate court disagreed.“Although the sentencing judge found that the mitigating factors in this case included ‘at least to some extent, the existence of systemic Gladue factors’, he did not find such factors had any bearing on Okimaw’s moral blameworthiness for these offences. We disagree…,” the court ruled.The appellate court said a sentence of 30 months would have been fair in most cases, but not for someone has “suffered the personal difficulties, systemic discrimination, and cultural challenges faced by Okimaw, a lesser sentence is called for in light of his reduced moral culpability.”In short, Okimaw’s life didn’t start off well. In fact it was put in jeopardy while his mom was pregnant, as she drank a lot, according to the court.Soon he found himself fighting his own addictions, and before long he was caught up in gang life until he walked away from that life at 21. A few years later he was attacked and stabbed in a swarming. Ever since then he would carry a paring knife with him for protection.At 27, he was slapped by a woman after an incident inside the Edmonton liquor store and her boyfriend and Okimaw exchanged words. A fight broke out and Okimaw stabbed the boyfriend with the knife multiple times. He argued it was in self-defence. The victim suffered non-life threatening injuries and never gave the court a victim impact statement.The court describes Okimaw as a good father who wants to be there for his kids.He’s currently working with a moving [email protected]: Shortly after this story was published Friday Frank Okimaw said he was being released from his halfway house and going to visit his kids.last_img read more

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Coal India 10 Stake Sale on Friday to Raise ₹24000 Crore Shares

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ICICI Prudential Life shares hit 52week high on Modi Govt approving listing

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Over 130 experts denounce Trumps revised travel ban

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