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Honest employers need not fear ‘guilty’ charge

first_img Comments are closed. The Commission for Racial Equality has denied claims that a new EU race directive, ratified last week, could mean UK firms will be guilty until proven innocent.A CRE spokeswoman said, “Honestly-run businesses have nothing to fear from this new legislation. The burden of proof only shifts on to the employer once a case against them is proven.”The “burden of proof” ruling – which is not written into the existing UK 1976 Race Relations Act – has been implemented because it can be difficult to obtain evidence in discrimination cases.The Council of Ministers approved the directive on 6 June, which will mean UK employees in all EU member states can take legal action against employers for racial discrimination.EU states must now adopt the directive and designate a body which will provide independent assistance to race discrimination victims pursuing complaints – a role already fulfilled in the UK by the CRE under the Race Relations Act 1976.The directive – the first part of a package of three proposals under Article 13 of the 1997 Treaty of Amsterdam – prohibits race discrimination in areas of employment, education, social security, healthcare and access to goods and services. It must be in force across the EU in three years and will be followed by an employment directive and an action programme.A timetable for discussion and final ratification of the following proposals – an employment directive and an action programme – will probably be decided by France, which will hold the six-month EU presidency from July.www.cec.org.uk Previous Article Next Article Honest employers need not fear ‘guilty’ chargeOn 13 Jun 2000 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Two People Injured In Hanover Crash

first_imgWNY News Now Stock Image.HANOVER — The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says charges are pending after two people were injured in a car crash Wednesday evening a in the Town of Hanover.Deputies responded to a crash on Alleghany Road at about 9:30 p.m.They say two people were transported to Brooks Memorial Hospital for treatment of their injuries.Railroad traffic in the area was halted for some time, deputies said. The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by several volunteer fire departments, New York State Police, Border Patrol.The investigation is continuing. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Thirsty landscape

first_imgBy Gary L. WadeUniversity of GeorgiaPeople throughout Georgia are facing restrictions on outdoorwater use now. Before the panic strikes in your yard, here are anumber of things you can do to help your plants make the best useof the water they have.First, make sure they have a generous supply of mulch over theirroots. Use 3 to 5 inches of mulch to help prevent evaporation andhold moisture in the soil.Fine-textured mulches, such as pine straw, pine bark mininuggetsand shredded hardwood mulch, conserve moisture better thancoarse-textured mulches. Mulch as large an area under the plantas you can. The roots of established woody ornamentals extend twoto three times the canopy spread.Avoid fertilizing plants during times of watering restrictions.Fertilizers stimulate tender new growth that has a high demandfor water. They’re also, chemically, salts. They can dehydrateroots and make drought stress even worse.Set prioritiesConcentrate watering selectively on plants that show signs ofmoisture stress. Some plants will wilt, while others will turnblue-green. Still others will show marginal leaf scorching, orentire branches may die back.Plants like dogwood, azaleas, hydrangeas, viburnums and Japanesemaples are among the first trees and shrubs to show moisturestress in the landscape. So when you can water, attend to theseplants first. Give priority, too, to trees and shrubs plantedwithin the past four months.Most healthy, well-established trees and shrubs, like oaks,pines, junipers and hollies, have extensive roots that find waterin the soil. They can survive weeks without extra water.Kindest cutsIf wilting or dieback becomes severe, you may have to cut backplants. With fewer leaves demanding water, the plants can do abetter job of conserving their internal moisture.I recently cut back a Shasta viburnum and oakleaf hydrangea in mylandscape within 10 inches of the ground because they werereaching the permanent wilting point, and I couldn’t meet theirdaily water needs. These plants will thank me later when therains return and abundant new growth emerges.When you can water, use a handheld hose or sprinkling can todirect water to the roots. Give the water time to sink into thesoil, then water again slowly. Drip irrigation or ooze hose areother good ways to water slowly. Let the water penetrate theground and not run off.Annual and perennial plants have shallow roots and are among thefirst landscape plants to show moisture stress. If daily wiltingbecomes progressively worse and you can’t meet their water needs,cut them back to half their size to help them conserve moisture.Make sure they’re well mulched, too.Move container plants to shaded areas to help them conservemoisture. And add a layer of mulch to the pots’ surface toprevent evaporative water loss.Night shiftWater at night, between 9 p.m. and 9 a.m. The reason watering isprohibited between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. is not just to conservewater during peak use. As much as half of the water you apply toyour landscape during the day is lost to evaporation. It does theplants little good. Watering at night time won’t encouragediseases, either, since the foliage is usually wet anyway fromthe dew.Remember that annuals can always be replaced. When you have todecide between having flowers and having water for cooking,bathing or cleaning, let the flowers go.When times get tough, though, gardeners get creative. If you knowa good water-saving technique, pass it along to your neighbor.Water is a resource we can’t live without, so make every dropcount.More information on water-wise landscaping techniques is in theseUniversity of Georgia Cooperative Extension publications on theWeb: (Gary Wade is a Cooperative Extension horticulturist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.) Http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B1073.htmHttp://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/horticulture/xeriscape.pdfHttp://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/horticulture/Drought.htmllast_img read more

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Banana Research

first_img “There are many uses for the plants, more than just the bananas themselves,” he said. “There are other uses for alternative energy and for ornamental varieties. I think they will be very popular once we do more research. We are still learning, but we know the environment here is manageable for the identified cold-hardy and short-cycled banana cultivars. They are mostly grown in tropical conditions. It’s exciting what we are learning, and we have growers who want to look at this as another potential commercial crop.” Greg Fonsah, a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences economist, has created his own little corner of the tropics on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. Less than 100 yards away from his office, Fonsah walks through row after row of tall broad-leafed foliage. A quick smile is evident as he swings his machete to and fro, shearing away leaves and branches as he goes.Though the plot stands within sight of the much-traveled road in front of the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center and is visible from Interstate 75, few realize exactly what it contains. Amid the experts who deal in peanuts, cotton, vegetables and tobacco, Fonsah likes to tell people about his beautiful field of bananas.Bananas?“This is not a surprise to me,” said Fonsah in his thick accent that has never left the Cameroon native. “Most of my colleagues said it would not be possible to grow bananas here. But because the conditions are similar, I knew it was possible. The bananas here are different, but they are very good.”While unique, Fonsah and colleagues actually started their banana research in Savannah in 2002 before starting a project in Tifton in 2009. The professor has an extensive background in the field, working for Del Monte and Aloha Farms for almost 15 years before coming to UGA in 2001. He believes banana production can be an entirely new and unique field for Georgia farmers, and he said the interest is already there. Although Fonsah says more studies need to be done, farmers are already calling him for information.One fact is not in dispute — Americans love bananas and lots of them. According to Fonsah, bananas are the most commonly consumed fresh fruit in the country, and consumption rose from 7 pounds per person in 1970 to 10.4 pounds per person in 2010. Nearly all of those bananas, an estimated 99 percent by Fonsah, come from overseas.“The United States spends $1.9 billion on bananas every year,” Fonsah said. “That’s bananas and plantains. But there’s no reason all of that money has to go somewhere else. The weather is conducive for cold-hardy and short-cycled banana cultivars here, and with the diverse cultural backgrounds, there is a niche market for bananas.”Fonsah said he has about 65 different varieties on his plot for consumption, cooking and ornamental use. But what he pulls off his plants is not what you usually see at your local grocery store. Americans are most accustomed to eating Cavendish bananas, which are a bit different than the Veinte Cohol and several other varieties that Fonsah has grown. The Veinte Cohol is a short-cycle banana, which can be planted in the spring and will produce a bunch in about six months. It can be harvested in the fall (before the first frost) and is a smaller, flatter, sweeter variety.“We have to do more studies on the short cycle, cold hardy and ornamentals because they are not ready for commercial harvest yet,” Fonsah said. “But there is a lot of impatience because (producers) want them on the market now. The next level we must go to is harvesting and doing consumer studies.”Still, Fonsah continues to look for new varieties. In his banana field, Fonsah also grows Saba bananas, which are mainly used for cooking, like plantains. Unlike the Veinte Cohol or other varieties that are consumed, the Saba bananas grow in a tight bunch on a very large and tall pseudostem. Fonsah said they are starchy, pulpy and a great source of potassium. A respected expert in the field of fresh produce production and marketing, Fonsah has published hundreds of articles in professional journals on banana production as well as tomatoes, peppers, blueberries, pecans and other fruits and vegetables. Fonsah considers his little-known banana paradise at the Tifton campus his real classroom and sanctuary. He tends to the plants regularly and has had students from around the world join him in his research, trying to determine exactly which varieties work best under the south Georgia sun.last_img read more

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Boards brace for losses in  the time of coronavirus

first_img..a curtailed or cancelled IPL would mean a significant losses for the Board of Control for Cricket in IndiaBy Amlan ChakrabortyNEW DELHI (Reuters) – When the mighty Indian cricket board decided this week that only the chief among its national selectors would travel business class, it merely confirmed straitened times for the game amid the coronavirus outbreak.The uncharacteristic austerity by the world’s richest cricket board follows its decision earlier this month to halve the winner’s purse at this year’s Indian Premier League (IPL), a cash cow with a brand value of $6.8 billion.The franchise-based Twenty20 league was scheduled to begin on March 29 but has now been postponed until April 15.To many, a condensed tournament, possibly without foreign players, later this year looks like a more realistic prospect.A curtailed or cancelled tournament would mean significant losses for the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), which gets around 40 billion rupees (453.6 million pounds) annually from broadcaster STAR India and its central pool of sponsors. “The loss at this stage is notional. The biggest loser in any economic dynamics is always its biggest gainer, which is BCCI in this case,” SportzPower co-founder Thomas Abraham, whose company monitors sports business in India, told Reuters.“For STAR India, it’s also a loss of opportunity. It was building the India launch of its Disney+ OTT (streaming service) around the IPL.”A truncated tournament would necessitate renegotiation with Disney-owned STAR India, which was not available to share how it plans to dovetail the launch of its new platform with the IPL. Chinese smartphone maker Vivo, which bagged the 2018-22 title rights for 219 million rupees, is unlikely to suffer a big loss.“They would have been preparing for new launches around IPL. They can still do it,” Abraham said.Vivo did not elaborate if the truncation had disrupted their plans to leverage their tournament rights.“In light of the global health risk … we at Vivo completely support BCCI’s decision to postpone the series,” Nipun Marya, Director of Vivo India’s Brand Strategy, said in a statement to Reuters. “We shall continuously evaluate the situation as it progresses.”MONITORING SITUATIONThe BCCI and IPL franchises also pay 20% of a player’s annual fee to his home board, which stands to lose that money if it does not allow the cricketer into the IPL due to fears about the coronavirus for example.A shorter tournament will mean a smaller share from the shrunken central pool of revenues for the eight IPL franchises, not to mention a reduction in gate receipts. Further afield, the Women’s Twenty20 World Cup narrowly escaped the health crisis but the outbreak has cast a shadow over the men’s event in Australia, which begins on Oct. 18.The International Cricket Council (ICC), which runs the tournament, said it was monitoring the situation.“We are planning for the event to go ahead as scheduled,” it said on the tournament website.Cricket Australia stands to lose some A$300 million (150.4 million pounds) should the coronavirus outbreak derail their high-profile home test series against India later this year. “We’re in uncertain times, and it’s difficult to project precisely what will transpire over the next number of months,” CA chief executive Kevin Roberts said this week.“But we will be working through with advice from experts, externally as to what are the various scenarios that are plausible, how likely are they, and how would we plan to deal with each of them.”IN THE BALANCEIn England, the fate of the inaugural ‘The Hundred’ championship hangs in the balance after the epicentre of the pandemic moved from Asia to Europe, shutting down most sport on the continent.The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) have invested heavily in promoting the competition in the 100-ball format, which is scheduled to begin on July 17.“It is clear that every industry, including cricket, will be impacted by this unprecedented situation,” Tom Moffat, chief executive of the Federation of International Cricketers’ Associations (FICA), told Reuters. “It’s more important than ever for the cricket industry to work together collaboratively at this time.”Individually, top players from outside India risk losing IPL contracts worth millions of dollars if they are unable to travel or their boards deny them permission to play.As far as FICA is concerned, Moffat said, the wellbeing of the players while the world deals with an international health crisis is far more important than cash.“Governing bodies, employers, and leagues owe a duty of care to provide players with a safe workplace,” he added. “And enforcing that players travel to, or work in conditions that are unsafe, would not meet that standard.”last_img read more

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