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Nominations open for National Fundraising Awards 2011

first_img  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Institute of Fundraising is encouraging fundraisers, their support agencies and supplier partners to make nominations for this year’s National Fundraising Awards.Applicants can make as many nominations as they wish, and may enter the same campaign for more than one category where applicable. There is no charge to make a nomination.This year there are four new awards categories: Best Use of Major Donor Fundraising, Best Integrated Fundraising and Campaigning Organisation, Most Committed to Learning and Development, and, for the first time, a category for suppliers to the sector – Best Supplier 2011.The winners will be announced at the Institute of Fundraising National Awards ceremony and dinner to be held at the Hilton London Metropole on 4 July 2011.All entry forms must be received by 17.00 on 1 March 2011.www.nationalawards.org.uk Tagged with: Awards Institute of Fundraising Nominations open for National Fundraising Awards 2011 Howard Lake | 20 January 2011 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Montgomery Bus Boycott, Bessemer, prisons – Class struggle then and now

first_imgFifty years after the end of the U.S. Civil War — and during the height of horrific lynchings of Black people in the Deep South by KKK terror — the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History was founded in 1915 by Dr. Carter Woodson and Rev. Jesse E. Moorland to research and promote the individual contributions of people of African descent, both inside the U.S. and throughout the African diaspora. The ASNLH launched a national “Negro History Week” in February 1926. Fifty years later in 1976, due to the influence of the Civil Rights Movement, this “Week” officially evolved into Black History Month in the U.S. Even before 1926, the plight of Black people as an oppressed nation inside the U.S. caught the international attention of socialists and communists. Vladimir Lenin, the leader of the Russian Revolution, wrote in 1917: “In the United States, [Black and Indigenous peoples] account for only 11.1%. They should be classed as an oppressed nation, for the equality won in the Civil War of 1861-65 and guaranteed by the Constitution of the republic was in many respects increasingly curtailed in the chief Negro areas (the South) in connection with the transition from the progressive, pre-monopoly capitalism of 1860-70 to the reactionary, monopoly capitalism (imperialism) of the new era, which in America was especially sharply etched out by the Spanish-American imperialist war of 1898 (i.e., a war between two robbers over the division of the booty).” (“Statistics and Sociology,” tinyurl.com/3eavxy5f)The great Vietnamese anti-colonial leader against U.S. and French imperialism, Ho Chi Minh, stated in his essay on “Lynching” in 1924, “It is well known that the Black race is the most oppressed and most exploited of the human family.” (La Correspondence Internationale, No. 59) He had written a prior essay on the Ku Klux Klan.  Decades later Sam Marcy, the late chairperson and working-class theoretician of Workers World Party, wrote, “Of all the great domestic political problems facing the working class and the oppressed people, none surpasses in importance the relationship of national oppression to the class struggle. Indeed, one may say that it is at the heart of the basic social problem in the United States.” (Nov. 25, 1983)Montgomery Bus Boycott: a precursor to Black Lives MatterBlack History Month has unfortunately been co-opted by bourgeois forces to focus mainly on past “achievements” of individual Black people and not on the impact of Black-led mass movements in ongoing struggles for national liberation and full equality today.Bus boycotters, no matter their age or ability, walked miles to work in Montgomery, February 1956.Take the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Bourgeois historians like to portray  Rosa Parks as an isolated Black seamstress, who just happened to refuse to give up her seat to a white man on a segregated bus on Dec. 1, 1955.  The truth is that hers was a planned action on the part of the local NAACP, of which Ms. Parks was a secretary. Before the church, where a young Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the pastor, became a main Boycott organizing center, there had long been discussions about organizing a bus boycott.  Dr. King and Ms. Parks may have been the most recognizable faces of the Boycott, but its success lay in the dynamic, sustained mass movement of the Black community, especially Black women. Organizers galvanized people who had cars — including this writer’s parents — to pick up and drop off carless workers, many of whom were domestic workers, at designated sites all around the city. Many walked miles to and from work including in all-white neighborhoods. This grassroots organizing not only defeated the segregated transportation edict in the former capital of the Confederacy on Dec. 21, 1956, it was the opening shot of the modern day Civil Rights Movement throughout the Deep South — with mass demonstrations, marches, sit-ins, shutdowns and more in the midst of police and KKK violence. The Bus Boycott was a precursor to today’s Black Lives Matter movement, fusing civil rights and workers rights.From Montgomery to BessemerAs this writer wrote in 2000, “No struggle takes place within a vacuum; no struggle is isolated from the general laws of nature and society. [T]o fully understand the Black struggle or the Black experience in the U.S. and its status today, we have to view its development in relationship to the overall class struggle. The Black struggle in this country has many rich lessons for us as workers, as progressives and as revolutionaries.” (“What is a nation?” from “A Voice from Harper’s Ferry,” see tinyurl.com/yxrc35c9)One of those rich lessons coming from the Bus Boycott is taking place again in Bessemer, Ala., just 15 miles outside the former steel city of Birmingham.Jennifer Bates, an employee at the Bessemer Amazon facility, has been helping to organize the union drive. Of the majority-Black workforce there, almost half are women.With a population of less than 30,000, the city has suddenly gained national and even international attention, because a group of majority Black workers are in the midst of a historic union organizing drive against Amazon — arguably the most powerful global corporation in the U.S. and perhaps the world.   On Feb. 8, these warehouse workers began a mail-in vote on representation, with the backing of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), in response to Amazon’s horrific working conditions, a lack of protection from COVID, low wages and racism from white management. And 80% of these workers are African American, with 43% being Black women.  Even though the workers at this Deep South warehouse number around only 5,800 out of a total 935,000 Amazon workers throughout the U.S., their struggle for a union will have an unprecedented ripple effect, not only for the workers in Alabama — only 8% are unionized — but for the entire global working class.   Alabama is one of 27 states with Taft-Hartley “right-to-work” laws. This means that joining a union is not a prerequisite for getting a job; “so-called” open shops thus purposely fracture union solidarity. Workers are then left at the mercy of racist and sexist bosses without any protection against abuse under a collective bargaining agreement. The struggle to unionize in Bessemer has global implications, because Amazon is a corporation worth close to $1 trillion, whose profit-hungry tentacles stretch across several continents. Amazon represents modern monopoly capitalism 2.0, while in the 1950s during the Bus Boycott, mom and pop stores alongside Woolworth’s were the backbone of the economy.Workers need solidarity – everywhereAnother important struggle occurring in parallel to the Bessemer struggle was the Jan. 1-31 strike by incarcerated workers throughout the Alabama Department of Corrections prison system. This work strike and “ 30 Day Economic Blackout” was led by the Free Alabama Movement. As incarcerated workers, they protested against some of the same conditions raised by the Bessemer workers — superexploitation, racism, physical brutality, horrific work conditions exacerbated by the pandemic — including no masks, lack of social distancing and healthy food, and more. The ADOC has been deemed by many as the most violent prison system in the country.  (Read “Alabama prisons: ON STRIKE!” at tinyurl.com/y458aakr)In Alabama, Black people constitute 28% of state residents, but 43% of people in jail and 54% of people in prison. (al.com) There really is no fundamental difference between the racism and exploitation facing the Bessemer Amazon workers and the Alabama incarcerated workers except for the physical restraint preventing the imprisoned workers from walking out of their cells. As the Prisoners Solidarity Committee of Workers World Party demands, “Free them all!”Just like the struggle in Montgomery over 65 years ago, the Bessemer Amazon workers and the incarcerated workers in Alabama are also counting on classwide solidarity between the organized and unorganized — not only to win the immediate battles that directly confront them, but to extend their struggle to win the rights of millions of workers globally. These struggles are the real meaning of what Black History is all about. The writer was born in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Tweet @MoniFromHome.  FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Garda thought she would be killed by teenage driver

first_imgEmail WhatsApp Advertisement Previous articleEarly start for Limerick business leaders of tomorrowNext articleEmergency services put their backs into life-saving research admin Facebook Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A COMMUNITY garda thought she would be killed when a teenager violently drove a stolen car directly at her, a court has heard.Niamh Keogh is a garda attached to Limerick’s Roxboro Road community policing unit and for the last six years has been stationed to liaise with youths “on the ground” in the O’Malley Park area of Southill.On May 23, 2012, Garda Keogh was on foot patrol in the area shortly before 4pm when she first encountered a 1998 Cork registered red Mazda 323.The car, gda Keogh said, was first heard revving violently and screeching near the Castle Oaks View are Southill. A few moments later, she observed the car driving towards her as she walked near the Southill Area Centre.The driver, a then 16-year-old teen, drove down the road towards garda Keogh in an erratic and dangerous matter before doing a U-turn and speeding off in the opposite direction.Garda Keogh’s evidence came in the second day of the trial of a now 17 year old teenager charged with the alleged endangerment of the garda and the unlawful use of a stolen car on the date in question.The trial running at Limerick Circuit Court before Judge Carroll Moran and a jury of eight women and four men was told that the car returned towards garda Keogh driving in the same manner as earlier.It was then that garda Keogh said the driver of the car was “pressing on the accelerator in a violent manner” before she described how the driver then started “driving straight towards me”.The court heard that garda Keogh “jumped to take evasive action behind a pillar” to protect herself she said.“I thought I was going to be killed or seriously injured”, gda Keogh told the Judge.She said that the car drove by and swerved before garda Keogh had an “unobstructed view” of the accused.“I saw the driver and I recognised him immediately” added garda Keogh who said that she was “100 per cent sure” it was the accused.“It is our role to know the youths in the area and on the ground”.Garda Keogh said that she was in fear for her life as the “vehicle was coming straight towards me”.Details of the car speeding off into the O’Malley Park area of Southill were given to the court before Garda Keogh called in the alert to the Roxboro Station.The trial continues.center_img Linkedin NewsBreaking newsGarda thought she would be killed by teenage driverBy admin – January 24, 2014 700 Print Twitterlast_img read more

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Library Offers Virtual Event Featuring Author Debbie Macomber

first_imgDebbie Macomber The Ocean City Free Public Library is hosting a virtual event with Debbie Macomber, as the featured speaker at 7 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 29 on Zoom.To register for the event go to https://tinyurl.com/ybkqpk2g.Macomber, author of A Walk Along the Beach, Window on the Bay, Cottage by the Sea, Any Dream Will Do, If Not for You, and the Rose Harbor Inn series, is a leading voice in women’s fiction.Thirteen of her novels have reached No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller lists, and five of her Christmas novels have been hit movies on the Hallmark Channel, including Mrs. Miracle and Mr. Miracle.Hallmark Channel also produced the original series Debbie Macomber’s Cedar Cove, based on Macomber’s Cedar Cove books.She is also the author of the cookbook Debbie Macomber’s Table. There are more than 200 million copies of her books in print worldwide.For more information on this speaker, visit prhspeakers.com.last_img read more

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12 Days Of Phishmas 2018: Page McConnell Gives A Candid Interview On The Streets Of London In 1996 [Watch]

first_imgIt’s that time of year again… In seven short days, Phish will return to New York’s Madison Square Garden for their annual four-night New Year’s run. Each year, we like to celebrate the season in the days leading up to Phish at MSG with the 12 Days of Phishmas, a daily series that gives you your Phish fix and helps stoke your excitement in the days leading up to the run. In 2016, we took you back to 12 historic Phish performances at The Garden. In 2017, with the Baker’s Dozen barely out of sight in the rearview, we relived the magic and mystery of the band’s historic residency.For years, we’ve been earmarking some of our favorite Phish interviews, behind-the-scenes footage, and other cool content that we haven’t found the right occasion to share with you…until now. For 2018, we’ve made you a very special Phishmas Advent calendar to help spice up your countdown to showtime. As we approach the start of the run on the 28th, we’ll open up one panel a day and reveal a fun surprise inside—a little something sweet and Phishy once a day until the Garden party begins. No peeking! By the time we’re finished with the calendar, it will finally be time for the gift we’ve all been waiting for: Four nights of Phish on their home court at the World’s Most Famous Arena.7 Days Til Phish: Page McConnell Gives An Interview On The Street In London (1996)On the sixth day of Phishmas… Page McConnell gives an informal, off-the-cuff interview on the street in London during Phish’s 1996 summer European tour. Extensive tours throughout Europe were still relatively new to the band at this point, and Page rarely gives interviews these days, making it even particularly cool to watch the keyboardist so enthusiastic to answer questions following their show at London’s Shepherd’s Bush Empire on 7/11/96.Looking back on Phish 22 summers ago is a feel-good trip down memory lane, as Page and later Trey (Anastasio) entertain fans on the sidewalk and sign autographs, hoping to push their musical following outside of the U.S. Although Phish has grown tremendously since this 1996 interview, it’s fascinating to hear about all of the signature elements of practice and performance (like the “Hey” exercise) that the band continues to incorporate into their rehearsal time in 2018.Watch the clip below to see Page field a barrage of questions on wide range of topics ranging from band’s initial distaste for constantly being compared to the Grateful Dead, his earliest memories of Trey, Jon, and Mike, what became of Jeff Holdsworth, and more.Page McConnell Gives An Interview On The Street In London[Video: spaceodyssee2000]We’ll be back tomorrow to open the seventh panel on our Phishmas 2018 Advent calendar. What other Phishmas surprises are in store? You’ll just have to wait and see…In the meantime, you can go back through the previous Phishmas surprises:On the first day of Phishmas… The Big Daddy ShowOn the second day of Phishmas… David Byrne Interviews PhishOn the third day of Phishmas… Trey Anastasio Talks Fare The Well At The New Yorker Festival On the fourth day of Phishmas… A Look Inside The Hoist Sessions From Cactus FilmsOn the fifth day of Phishmas… Mike Gordon Fascinates A Muscle Shoals Legend On the sixth day of Phishmas… Page McConnell Chats in the Streets of Londonlast_img read more

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Mask decontamination methods: Strengths, weaknesses, gaps

first_imgThe growing severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and challenges in the supply chain have resulted in severe shortages of N95 masks and reports of frequent mask reuse. This practice poses serious safety risks to healthcare workers. To help decision-makers develop back-up procedures that are as safe as possible, researchers from Harvard, Stanford, MIT, UC Berkeley, and other institutions teamed up to evaluate existing N95 decontamination methods and plot a practical course forward for implementing them.The consortium issued a report detailing the strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in application of three methods: heat, ultraviolet light (UVC), and vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) treatment. The report can be found on the consortium website, n95decon.org. Harvard’s coalition of the willing is led by John Doyle, Henry B. Silsbee Professor of Physics and co-director of the Harvard Quantum Initiative.“Our goal is to provide valuable information to help public health officials make the best possible decisions when they must resort to decontaminating and reusing masks rather than replacing them between patients,” said Doyle. “Each point of care will have very specific circumstances and will need to adapt — we are putting our heads together to ensure their operating procedures are as safe and efficient as they can be.”According to Doyle, the consortium came together organically, motivated by the need to provide overwhelmed health officials with reliable, accessible scientific information. Harvard volunteers include John Doyle, Adam Cohen, Louis Baum, Zack Lasner, Larissa Little, Andrew Preecha, Loïc Anderegg, Cole Meisenhelder, Yicheng Bao, Kezi Cheng, Alex Frenett, Robert Gustafson, Clare Ploucha, and Adam Kryskow.“It has been inspiring to see Harvard administrators and researchers, including graduate students and professors, jump into this service with such energy, thought and skill,” said Doyle.Andrew Preecha, a research assistant in Adam Cohen’s laboratory, master’s student at the Harvard Extension School, and one of Harvard’s 14 volunteers on the project, will be conducting heat-decontamination experiments.“We’re looking at the effectiveness of using sterilization equipment that hospitals already have to get more use out of these masks,” he said. Similar experiments are being carried out elsewhere on the effectiveness of other approaches.The N95DECON report provides important details, links to protocols and commercial services, and quick-reference infographics to help health officials assess which methods are best for their particular situation.As the N95DECON scientists release this first wave of information, they are carrying out new decontamination experiments on N95 masks to clarify their safety and efficacy issues. This new knowledge will be used to create toolkits that provide a scientific basis for choices institutions make as they update their standard operating procedures and submit them to the FDA for approval. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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Measuring faculty perceptions of diversity

first_imgA recent faculty job satisfaction survey by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE), the research-practice partnership based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), revealed significant disparities in perception between faculty of different racial and ethnic backgrounds.As more colleges and universities take steps toward diversity and inclusion, these findings suggest that university leaders need to do more to ensure that the work translates into meaningful change and success for everyone. HGSE spoke to Kiernan Mathews, director and principal investigator of COACHE, about what the survey data means for higher education institutions.Was anything about the survey results surprising?Since George Floyd’s murder, there’s been a kind of newfound awareness of where the seat of change really needs to be in the academy. It’s not the Black faculty, Hispanic, and Latinx faculty. It’s not the Indigenous faculty who have to “fit.” It’s the white faculty — the majority faculty — who have to change the broken system they perpetuate, who have to accommodate new perspectives, and broaden their definitions of excellence. We’ve been an equity-minded project since 2005, but the events of this year have emboldened COACHE to better interrogate the privilege of white faculty in the academy.The surprise is how wide the gap is between white faculty who feel that their colleagues and leadership are fully in support of diversity and inclusion and Black faculty who don’t agree that their colleagues and leadership are doing what they can.These data show an 18- to 20-point difference in the percentage of white faculty and Black faculty who agree that leadership and colleagues are committed to supporting and promoting diversity on campus. It’s a stark difference in what white faculty feel to be true and what Black faculty know to be true with respect to the support and promotion of diversity.What are the implications of this, and how could it affect the support and promotion of diversity?The question for presidents, provost, and deans is, is your visible leadership on diversity that you are touting in the university magazine, putting on your website, showing to prospective faculty and students — is that visible leadership and diversity actually changing campus culture? Or is it just making white faculty feel better about themselves and their institutions?What the data shows is that white faculty are thinking that we’re doing great. My president says the right things, the faculty and my colleagues in the department say all the right things, but that’s not necessarily what Black faculty see. What they’re telling COACHE — and this is echoed in our qualitative data — is raising questions about whether that visible leadership is really effecting systemic change. It may be necessary, but it’s not sufficient for sustained scrutiny of the status quo. This makes the faculty who’ve benefitted from the status quo for decades very uncomfortable.Read the full interview here. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Dell Technologies Sponsors Nahomie’s Trip to One Young World

first_imgDell Technologies recently sponsored Haitian post-college professional Nahomie Auguste’s trip to One Young World, a global forum that gathers young leaders from around the world to develop solutions to the world’s most pressing issues. This year’s forum was held in London.Nahomie had twice applied for sponsorships to attend One Young World; however, she was rejected both times. But Nahomie refused to give up. She shared with me that she remembered the advice of her father who told her to “never be ashamed to ask for information.” After attending a Dell Technolgies workshop at a Haiti Tech Summit led by Patricia Floriss, Nahomie contacted Patricia about Dell sponsoring her to come to One Young World…and the rest was history. During One Young World, Nahomie was also lucky enough to meet speakers like Caroline Casey of Valuable 500 and Oscar Anderson who is doing work in Vietnam with people who have cerebral palsy.She also met various Dell Technologies team members; namely, Thomas Leplatre, Sarah Loveridge, and David Coughlan. They all shared insights on what the organization is doing to transform people’s lives and in the area of sustainability. Nahomie was impressed by the “just be you” culture that Dell Technologies encourages as well as our employee resource groups (ERGs) and what they stand for, particularly the Women in Action ERG, as Nahomie shared that she has frequently been the only woman in a room full of men. When asked if she would consider a career at Dell Technologies in the future, with great enthusiasm she said, “ Yes, now all I have to do is convince them to open an office in Port-au-Prince, work remotely, or move to Texas!”Nahomie’s story is an example of how at Dell Technologies, we are committed to driving human progress. Through our reach, technology and people we strive to create a positive and lasting impact on humankind and the planet. We hope that those who attended One Young World carry this message forward into the future.last_img read more

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Dressed to Kill! Get a Glittery First Look at Michael C. Hall in Hedwig

first_img Related Shows Michael C. Hall is ready to put on some makeup, turn up the eight track and pull the wig down from the shelf! The Broadway alum and Dexter favorite will headline Hedwig and the Angry Inch beginning October 16 at the Belasco Theatre, succeeding Andrew Rannells and Neil Patrick Harris in the role of the East German rock goddess. Directed by Michael Mayer, the Tony-winning revival of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s 1998 musical tells the story of Hedwig, who regales the audience with her tales of escaping communist East Berlin, her botched sex-change operation and her failed relationship with rock icon Tommy Gnosis. Check out Hall’s glittering new look, then see him rock out beginning October 16! Hedwig and the Angry Inch View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015last_img read more

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Last Brazilian World War II Veteran Pilot Dies

first_img After his return to Brazil, he remained in the 1st Fighter Aviation Regiment, on the Santa Cruz Air Force Base. Later, he studied aeronautical engineering and served as Director of Engineering at the Material Directorate and the Routes Directorate. While living in Canada, he was part of the International Civil Aviation Organization, in the city of Montreal. By Dialogo September 18, 2013 The Brazilian Air Force (FAB) and the Brazilian Expeditionary Force (FEB) registered in Brazil’s military history pages of glory and heroism that make us proud and are valued by the allied countries in the Second World War conflict. Brig. MIRANDA CORRÊA will be remembered as an example of courage, professional virtue, an aeronautical vocation motivator, and love to the Homeland that watch his birth. By the way, Brazil was the only country which offered soldiers to the Great War without being intimidated or invited. It only requested, in retribution, a piece of land in Pistoia, Italy, to bury his dead. Today, the Pistoia cemetery is symbolic and the remains of our soldiers rest at the FEB Monument at Rio de Janeiro city.Ney de Araripe Sucupira – Honorary Member of the Brazilian Air Force – São Paulo Lieutenant General José Carlos de Miranda Corrêa died on September 15, in Rio de Janeiro. He died at 1:13 p.m. at the age of 93, in the Hospital Central da Aeronáutica (HCA), where he was hospitalized. Lieutenant General Miranda Corrêa was a Combat Pilot and Information Officer in the World War II 1st Fighter Aviation Regiment, in Italy. Between November 13, 1944 and January 3, 1945, he participated in eight war missions. Currently, he was the last surviving Brazilian veteran of World War II. Before he fought in Italy, then Lieutenant Miranda Corrêa performed his training as a Combat Pilot in the United States and Panama. Some of the awards he was honored with throughout his career include the Aviation Cross – A Ribbon, the Italy Campaign, the Atlantic South Campaign, the Order of Air Merit, the Santos Dumont Order of Merit, a Distinguished Flying Cross (for sinking a German ship on the coast of Rio de Janeiro), a Presidential Unit Citation, and a Bronze Star, with the latter three having been awarded by the U.S. government. last_img read more

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